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  #1  
Old 18-08-13, 12:36 AM
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Default Military Structure Leaves Experts Baffled

Well, do any of the resident experts of the British Badge Forum know the answer?

http://www.thisissurreytoday.co.uk/M...#axzz2cH10o7gI
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  #2  
Old 18-08-13, 04:39 PM
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Could it possibly be for the 'Secret Army' in the event a German invasion was successful?
David
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  #3  
Old 18-08-13, 05:01 PM
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I recall playing (when young.....) in one of these type of buildings that had been somewhere between Brecon town and the river Usk. I always thought they were "bolt holes" in the event of invasion. I am very surprised that people from the newspaper arn't a little more "switched on" and able to think about the possible events at the time (i.e. the threat of invasion. duh) when they find things like this - sign of the times I guess. I can recall finding a number of these around and about when we were moving around UK army barracks.
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Old 18-08-13, 05:13 PM
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Possibly a hidden magazine, but that does not explain the windows.
Could it have been a structure from which to remotely ignite decoy fires during an air raid to draw the bombers away from a location or town?
Eddie
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Old 18-08-13, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tremain View Post
Could it possibly be for the 'Secret Army' in the event a German invasion was successful?
David
I discovered a very similar construction in the mid 50s in an area of dense privately owned woodland on an estate a few miles south east of Blechingley, Surrey. I recall that it was mostly above ground level but surrounded by large berms. In those pre-www days how would a schoolboy have researched it? So - no further information.
Mike
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Old 18-08-13, 07:22 PM
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hi ,

just a guess but could the british have used something similar,an artillery range finder for the downs

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/WWII-Germa...ht_3604wt_1255

philip
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Old 18-08-13, 08:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wright241 View Post
I recall playing (when young.....) in one of these type of buildings that had been somewhere between Brecon town and the river Usk. I always thought they were "bolt holes" in the event of invasion. I am very surprised that people from the newspaper arn't a little more "switched on" and able to think about the possible events at the time (i.e. the threat of invasion. duh) when they find things like this - sign of the times I guess. I can recall finding a number of these around and about when we were moving around UK army barracks.
David,
they were probably at the Island Fields and are still there, full of Cow Pooh! lol

Andy
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  #8  
Old 10-09-13, 01:58 PM
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It's probably part of an old Home Guard "Stop Line". As part of the defence of the UK various stop lines were drawn on maps and fortified. The fortifications would be occupied by the Home Guard and home based units of the army. The concept was based on a fighting withdrawal strategy whereby each stop line would engage the Germans until almost overrun before withdrawing to the next position.

These bunkers were sometimes grouped together overlooking features which would be used as a killing zone for maximum effect.

As Surrey formed part of the potential front line I am of the opinion that's what this signifies.
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Old 10-09-13, 02:51 PM
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You can always try this website.......
http://www.pillboxesuk.co.uk/
http://www.derelictlondon.com/war---...pillboxes.html
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Old 11-09-13, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebro View Post
Possibly a hidden magazine, but that does not explain the windows.
Could it have been a structure from which to remotely ignite decoy fires during an air raid to draw the bombers away from a location or town?
Eddie
I agree, I have seen a number od structures like this around the country that were the control centres for Q and K sites that replicated the light signatures of various towns and establishments of strategic importance to lure bombers away from the real targets. There is a book titled (I think) Fields of deception that lists all known decoy sites in the UK, might be worth cross referencing this site with those listed?

Tony
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  #11  
Old 11-09-13, 01:46 PM
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I've done a wee bit of googling on this and as a result I'm more convinced than ever that the bunker was part of the "Dorking GHQ Line B" which was a defensive "stop line" in WW2.

Reigate Fort formed part of the "London Defence Scheme" since 1889 and was designated as a "mobilisation centre" as part of a 72 mile stop line. It was one of 13 constructed. It was brought back into use for WW2 and new bunkers were built. This one in my opinion is undoubtedly one of those.
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