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  #16  
Old 17-10-12, 07:09 PM
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Graham Stewart Graham Stewart is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Staffsyeoman View Post
I think it's simpler.

1. Queen's South Africa Medal
2. King's South Africa Medal
3. Army Long Service & Good Conduct.

The KSA could not be awarded to soldiers without the QSA; and the vagiaries of orthochromatic film play tricks with light and dark tones on period medal ribbons, which is to say that I don't think it is the Tibet Medal. I plump for the LS&GC (which didn't get white edges until 1918) on balance of his being a regular.
QSA is easily identifiable in period photo's and although would go with a KSA for regulars or militia(who were embodied) - not so for a Volunteer, especially if his V.S.C. only entered theatre after the death of Victoria. Again A LSGC wouldn't be awarded to a Volunteer, who were awarded a VLSGC, which had a very dark green ribbon.
Cpl___2_Vol_Bn_NF_Ed_VII_Volunteer_Long_Service_Medal001.jpg
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  #17  
Old 17-10-12, 07:41 PM
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Unknown Sgt Major - new cuff.jpg
An unknown Volunteer/T.F. Sgt Major of the Northumberland Fusiliers with wife & sons, wearing the Q.S.A. & V.L.S.G.C. together indicating service with a V.S.C. prior to Victorias death.
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  #18  
Old 17-10-12, 07:59 PM
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My great, great uncle, 7th Hussars then 3rd Hussars, with QSA medal

Last edited by Nozzer; 09-11-12 at 06:29 PM.
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  #19  
Old 17-10-12, 08:19 PM
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Gents,

Thank you all very much indeed for your input and for the benefit of your knowledge and experience.

Peter.

(Not a Victoria Cross, Matti! I ask ya!!!)

Last edited by Peter J; 18-10-12 at 09:09 AM.
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  #20  
Old 17-10-12, 08:51 PM
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I go along with the QSA KSA LSGC theory.

In general, greyscale photos pre-c. 1925 are ortho film which, with caveats, renders red/orange/yellow very dark, green neutral, blue pale.

The caveats involve the amount of black or white [darkening or pastel] in the originals. Pure black and pure white show as .......... surprise surprise ......

black, or white.

Simples!
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  #21  
Old 18-10-12, 03:27 AM
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Having had a few problems lately in trying to decipher medal ribbons from old photographs, I have found these notes very helpful. Thanks for posting them.

Cheers,
JohnG
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  #22  
Old 18-10-12, 07:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpy View Post
I go along with the QSA KSA LSGC theory.

In general, greyscale photos pre-c. 1925 are ortho film which, with caveats, renders red/orange/yellow very dark, green neutral, blue pale.

The caveats involve the amount of black or white [darkening or pastel] in the originals. Pure black and pure white show as .......... surprise surprise ......

black, or white.

Simples!
Just an example to show the effect on a badge of known colour, AA Command is a black bow on red but appears reversed in the pic, unless it's an unrecorded variant(unlikely)
Lee
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File Type: jpg AA.jpg (30.3 KB, 22 views)
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  #23  
Old 18-10-12, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Old Smelly View Post
Just an example to show the effect on a badge of known colour, AA Command is a black bow on red but appears reversed in the pic, unless it's an unrecorded variant(unlikely)
Lee

Lee,

That is remarkable.

Can I just throw a possible spanner in the works by asking; if the black areas of the badge appear so light, then why don't the other black/dark hues in the photo appear that way too (such as the lady's pupils, for example)?

Could it have anything to do with the red background of the badge?

Peter.
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  #24  
Old 18-10-12, 08:43 AM
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I doubt if ortho film was used in WW II
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  #25  
Old 18-10-12, 10:00 AM
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I understand that there were restrictions on certain chemicals in WW2 which could cause some anomalies I think this badge is the earlier painted type with gloss black, perhaps some light bounce off the surface, but also note how dark the red looks.
Lee
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  #26  
Old 18-10-12, 10:28 AM
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When film finally came on sale again at the end of WW2 it was ex RAF Panchromatic film which was available, which I understood to be the type of film in general use by the services during WW2.

I think a very salient point was made above by the suggestion different effects were produced during the processing of the film, according to what chemicals were available.

And for your information PJ, and your expert knowledge of the City of London, I would mention the first shop I knew of to sell the surplus film was in Houndsditch, right bang facing St. Mary Axe. I imagine it is long since gone in redevelopment after the WW2 bombing of that area.

Cheers,

johnG
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  #27  
Old 18-10-12, 11:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnG View Post
When film finally came on sale again at the end of WW2 it was ex RAF Panchromatic film which was available, which I understood to be the type of film in general use by the services during WW2.

I think a very salient point was made above by the suggestion different effects were produced during the processing of the film, according to what chemicals were available.

And for your information PJ, and your expert knowledge of the City of London, I would mention the first shop I knew of to sell the surplus film was in Houndsditch, right bang facing St. Mary Axe. I imagine it is long since gone in redevelopment after the WW2 bombing of that area.

Cheers,

johnG
Thanks John - always good to have a little more local London info to digest

PJ
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