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  #1  
Old 07-07-21, 04:01 PM
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Question 58th Foot (Rutland) officers collar badge 1874-81

I bought this 58th Foot (Rutland) officers collar badge which as you can see has had the top and bottom scrolls blackened as is the reverse.

These scrolls should be silver gilt, anyone have an idea why this was done?

Thanks for looking.

Rob
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File Type: jpg P1030706.jpg (67.1 KB, 32 views)

Last edited by Sonofacqms; 07-07-21 at 04:07 PM.
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  #2  
Old 07-07-21, 04:06 PM
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Definitely blackened, not toned?
(My initial thought was that the badge was backed with lead but the yellow metal is mounted).
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Old 07-07-21, 04:13 PM
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Your photographs are poor, but its definately corrosion due to nature not blackening caused by man.

regards
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  #4  
Old 07-07-21, 04:43 PM
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Default 58th Foot (Rutland) officers collar badge 1874-81

Two more photos, I hope they are clearer.

Rob
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Old 07-07-21, 04:47 PM
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They confirm my conclusion.

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  #6  
Old 07-07-21, 05:02 PM
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I think that Simon is correct, it was extremely common for the silvering used at that time to go completely black when tarnished.
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  #7  
Old 07-07-21, 05:12 PM
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Default 58th Foot (Rutland) officers collar badge 1874-81

Thanks chaps for your thoughts, do you think a good soaking in white spirit vinegar may produce some good results or should I try some other method?

Rob
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Old 07-07-21, 05:34 PM
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There is also the possibility that there is some lead content in there, which also darkens over time.

Terry
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Old 07-07-21, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonofacqms View Post
Thanks chaps for your thoughts, do you think a good soaking in white spirit vinegar may produce some good results or should I try some other method?

Rob
Personally I’d leave it alone. If it’s plate, which is highly likely, you run the risk of damaging or removing the plate depending on what it is you do. And, as silver it will only tarnish again in a short time.

At most I’d use a bit of lemon juice but don’t expect fireworks.
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Old 07-07-21, 06:27 PM
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In all my years I have never seen silver corrode like that. I believe any silver is long gone and the base metal has corroded. In my opinion, nothing to loose by giving it a good scrub, which may help it in the long run.

CB
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Old 07-07-21, 07:24 PM
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A light brush with a toothbrush dipped in silver dip, then rinse and dry after you could put a light lacquer on to keep it nice.
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Old 07-07-21, 08:06 PM
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I would leave it as is, we know it’s silver, and it looks great like that.
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Old 08-07-21, 02:51 PM
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Hi Rob,

I have been doing some research for my new book, 'Badges and Insignia of the King's Own Scottish Borderers from 1689-2006 also Associated Volunteer and Militia Units' from the Regimental Museums Collection and Others'.

one of the belt plates has a gilt frosted ground, on the plate the Cross of St Andrew in burnished silver plate, surmounting the cross the Castle of Edinburgh in silver plate the whole surrounded by a Thistle Wreath also in silver plate. However, on one of the plates only the castle remains in silver, the cross and wreath are completely copper with no sign of any silver. I might point out that there is no polishing damage to the detail of the thistle wreath.
This made me think as the cross, castle and wreath can be removed from the plate for cleaning, and after some research, if silver plate on copper is submerged in a cleaning solution there may be a chemical reaction which would remove the silver plate or blacken and tarnish the silver. I have included a link which explains the effects of damage to silver items.

Also a picture of the belt buckle in question.

Just a thought

Cheers
Hiram


https://www.canada.ca/en/conservatio...-products.html
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Last edited by Borderer; 09-07-21 at 12:06 PM. Reason: Add a photograph
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  #14  
Old 08-07-21, 03:13 PM
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Cool 58th Foot (Rutland) officers collar badge 1874-81

Thanks again chaps for your advice which varies as you all have different views on how best badges look in a collection, I may give it a gentle clean with one fluid or another on the reverse to start with, this would be a guide as to what the outcome would be or I may leave it as is.

Rob
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