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  #16  
Old 27-04-08, 03:06 PM
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I have in the past used a cocktail stick to pick and rub the varnish off as being wood it does not scratch the badge or remove the patina.

Malc
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  #17  
Old 27-04-08, 03:54 PM
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Thanks for the advice boys.... I'm not too worried about patina as it had been polished prior to varnishing and it's quite amazing what a month pinned to the garden fence does patina-wise!
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  #18  
Old 28-04-08, 12:06 AM
uncletomscabin uncletomscabin is offline
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Default varnish remover

I do a lot of refinishing of old furniture. I have found a stripper that is orange (citrus) based that is not caustic. It doesn't give off toxic fumes either. Many other strippers are caustic and may affect the metal. Make sure that what ever kind you use that it won't etch your badge. With the orange stripper you can use a soft brush to take the varnish off, after it has set a while. It can be rinsed clean with water then, to take off the stripper. You could also use a small piece of wood (sharpened of course), to scrape the heavy areas. Good luck!! uncletomscabin
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  #19  
Old 03-05-08, 08:05 PM
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Default cleaning badges and repairing badges

Hi gentlemen,
I'm going to try and down load two photo's for you opinions, more info later.
Dave C.
The first photo is as I received this badge, the second one is after I had repaired it, in my opinion and I have already voiced it, I would rather have a properly repaired badge than a scrap badge ?? over to the more knowledgeable members.
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File Type: jpg IMG_1057.jpg (87.9 KB, 135 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1105.jpg (79.4 KB, 129 views)

Last edited by davec2; 03-05-08 at 08:16 PM.
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  #20  
Old 03-05-08, 08:39 PM
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Dave, From the images, you have been able to get rid of the glob of solder and refasten the slider? Could you explain the techique that you used to get rid of the solder? Further, what is the condition of the obverse of the badge?
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  #21  
Old 03-05-08, 09:09 PM
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Hi Bill, as you have probably realised, to remove the lead solder without using chemicals ( a definite no-no ), needs heat and elbow grease, neither is good for the badge but you have to decide on your own feelings and what you want.
I had an old and genuine badge that had been ruined by the soft solder and I prefer what I have now, also, if you don't remove all the muck you get solder intrusion in the new joint.
Lastly, there has to be an adverse effect on the obverse side, particularly, when I then use silver solder ( a higher melting point ), to re-attach the slider, please remember that this repair is solely for my collection, should it be for re-sale, I would make everyone aware that it was a repair.
The light is not suitable for taking more photo's but I will try in the morning to post a pic of the front, the hardest part will be remembering how I did the first two !!
Purists will now be cringing but I am quite happy with this badge and if the truth be known, one or two people who will condem me would probably feel as I do, secretly of course !!!!
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  #22  
Old 04-05-08, 05:30 AM
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Malcolm Davey Malcolm Davey is offline
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Dave
Having sent badges to you for repair before, and have recommended your services to other people, it's about time you came clean and let people know of your talent's, lol
I think we have touched on this subject of having repaired badges in one's collection in another thread, as I said then I do not mind having genuine repaired badges in my collection I only have 2, and these will not be replaced until I find the same undamaged examples.
Each collector knows their likes and dislikes when it comes to repairing badges some collectors like to repair badges themselves, I'm not one of them. You provide a service which I for one am grateful for.

Malc
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File Type: jpg File0928.jpg (54.4 KB, 80 views)
File Type: jpg File0929.jpg (56.5 KB, 59 views)
File Type: jpg File0930.jpg (46.8 KB, 77 views)
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  #23  
Old 04-05-08, 08:50 AM
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Default repairing badges etc

Hi Malc,
Thanks for your kind words, I think it's because you understand what happens to a badge when it's repaired that you can accept the procedure and I have to admit that most of the time, the finished article can be very acceptable ( I like yours !! ). Sadly, there are times when you can never bring a badge back to life and that is when people's own preferences come into play, I am posting a photo of the obverse side of my newly acquired R.D.F. badge, particularly for Bill, it has lost a little of it's original patina, it would have lost some, when originally lead soldered, so it does come back. I will say that the photo does seem to over-exaggerate the change, while I'm holding it, it is a nice addition to my collection and I'm well pleased, that's all that matters, don't you think ??
Dave.
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  #24  
Old 04-05-08, 10:56 AM
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Good work Dave.
I am in agreement that a "well" repaired badge is quite acceptable in the scheme of collecting. (Too bad you are across the pond. It would be difficult to make use of your services from over here.)
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  #25  
Old 05-05-08, 10:45 PM
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Smile Repaired badges

Dave, your repairs look superb, what better in a collection than a genuine badge that has been repaired rather than a restrike! I have been repairing badges for over 20 years for my own collection and other people on request and I do not think repairs to genuine badges when well done detract from the item.
Proof of this is in the Bosley sale 24th October 2007, lot 398 F&FIY s/title with one loop replaced, est 40-60 made 176
As an old friend and collector said to me once, "Good badges make good money" and another friend said "Good tradesmen are worth their weight in gold".
Keep on repairing and save the nations heritage!
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  #26  
Old 06-05-08, 01:31 PM
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Hi Sonofacqms, you've cheered me up no end, how do you feel about the change in the patina of a repaired badge, I feel it is a necessary evil and I know that eventually the badge will develope an aged look again ??
Thanks again,

Dave.

Last edited by davec2; 06-05-08 at 04:44 PM. Reason: missed word, oops.
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  #27  
Old 06-05-08, 02:17 PM
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I too have repaired badges, and I agree with all comments so far etc. on the ethics of it all. However is there a source for sliders and loops? Can they be purchased, if so where from or do you have to do what I have done so far and use second hand ones from badges that are of no use or value?
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  #28  
Old 06-05-08, 05:02 PM
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Hi John, ethics I think, can cover a multitude of sins, as soon as a badge is repaired, regardless of what is done to it, it is no longer original, assuming that everyone accepts that point, we can then go on to the degree of the repair.
I have tried desperately to get a couple of badge manufacturers to sell me eyelets, I think you have more chance of seeing god but somehow, they are about, a job lot went on ebay a few weeks ago, I missed them !!!
I sorce my own half-hard copper wire and make my own, generally, with eyelets, a repair is a repair is a repair etc but when you come to sliders, I think ethics and morals come in to play.
I also source my own brass strips, when I use these strips, particularly for re-sale, I couldn't, for the life of me, describe them other than, new sliders, if I re-attach the original slider, again for re-sale, I am specific in my description, it is as is and also if I can salvage a ' good ' slider, that is explained too, transparency is vital.
There are other repairs of course, I have re-attached several scrolls or crowns, what do you say ?? exactly what has been done, there must be no come back, especially when, as in my case, I sell repaired badges, if everyone is open and above board, the ethics of repairing and collecting can run hand in hand.
The hardest to convince are the purists and like all of us, they are quite entitled to their opinions but it must remain just that, an opinion, after all, is there a right or a wrong in this debate ?? I don't think so but I've said too much, as usual !!.
Dave.
P.S. Another repair for myself, using this time, an old slider, I'm waiting for a friend to ok this one, if he thinks it's a ' good un ', it also goes into my own collection until it can be improved upon !!
Oops, new info, sad but it's not as good as I thought !!
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File Type: jpg IMG_1165.jpg (93.0 KB, 38 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1166.jpg (82.6 KB, 54 views)

Last edited by davec2; 07-05-08 at 07:13 PM. Reason: new info !!
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  #29  
Old 09-05-08, 10:01 AM
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Default repairing badges etc

Hi folks,
This thread seems to be drying up, so I thought I would evoke some thoughts by showing you a badge that I will be listing on ebay shortly.
I will be listing it as an OSD badge with replacement blades, I would like to know member's thoughts, if possible, thanks in advance.
Dave.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_1172.jpg (93.4 KB, 31 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1173.jpg (98.7 KB, 38 views)

Last edited by davec2; 09-05-08 at 07:50 PM.
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  #30  
Old 10-05-08, 05:56 PM
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The repair/restoration of cap badges as I see it is no different to those restoration projects by museums, art and antique restorers, the objective being restore an object as close as is possible to its original condition. As long as there is intent to deceive I see no problem in including a restored badge in my collection.
When one considers incidents of damage done to notable paintings the Art World have not sniffed at the word restoration and I doubt if such work has had any substantial effect on the value of the object.
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