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  #16  
Old 21-11-21, 04:58 PM
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Default Cambridgeshire Regt badges

Phillip, what a lovely Cambridgeshire Regt badge, as a Cambridgeshire collector, it's a lovely item especially with the medals, thanks for sharing.
Rob
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  #17  
Old 21-11-21, 05:40 PM
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Me aged 9 or 10 “curating” my collection, not sure which was my first cap badge but probably in the photo.

Still have the hall marked silver Liverpool Pals cap badge bought when I was about 10 ( more than 60 years ago ) for pocket money and I still have that.

P.
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  #18  
Old 21-11-21, 05:45 PM
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My dad's economy plastic royal signals, which I still have along with his medals
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Jerry
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  #19  
Old 21-11-21, 06:05 PM
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Jerry, still have my Dads RCOS badges and medals but he gave them to me relatively recently in my collecting time.

P.
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  #20  
Old 21-11-21, 06:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Brydon View Post
Jerry, still have my Dads RCOS badges and medals but he gave them to me relatively recently in my collecting time.

P.
excellent Peter.

I was always to inherit my fathers medals, which I received when he passed away in 1993.
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  #21  
Old 21-11-21, 09:07 PM
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I was about 9 or 10, my parents had moved into a Victorian house a few years previously in 1957.

My dad kept chickens at the end of the garden, I was in the chicken run one day feeding the chickens worms, and whilst feeding, one was scratching the soil, up popped a badge.

After cleaning it, I found that it was a Middlesex Regiment badge, but it was many years later, when I began to take a real interest in militaria, that I discovered that it was in fact an economy version.

I have that badge still.

Meanwhile, also at the end of the garden was a rickety old shed. In there, standing on a shelf was, to my eyes, a large yellow coloured badge.

I kept this for many years not knowing what it actually was, but eventually found it to be an Officer's QVC Helmet Plate for 1st West India Regiment. The gilt was still in very good, as was the general overall condition.

It would have been wonderful to have known the antecedence of the previous occupants of the house.

I eventually swapped it for some other stuff when the bug bit and have since seen it on at least 3 dealers sites in the intervening years.

Who knows, one of you may have it now in your collections.

Regards.

Brian
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  #22  
Old 21-11-21, 09:47 PM
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I was about 12 or 13 when I was given various family badges -

Then I was about 14 or 15 my grandfather suggested that I collected 1914 infantry badges -

Then I started collected - and researching - KLR badges about 17 or 18 but more seriously when I was about 35


lots of KLR in my albums...
1914 Infantry
family badges...
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File Type: jpg Family badges etc.jpg (54.9 KB, 25 views)

Last edited by KLR; 21-11-21 at 09:57 PM.
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  #23  
Old 21-11-21, 10:59 PM
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Default My first badge

Actually, here I am wearing my first badge in 1955. Unfortunately I now suspect it was just a copy/restrike/fake or fantasy item!

Tim
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  #24  
Old 21-11-21, 11:53 PM
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My Dad gave me his Essex cap badge when I was in my late teens. He was captured at Monte Casino along with his brother. They were sent to Germany and Dad was made to work in a pipe factory. He was released by the Russians, and a Russian soldier and gave him a rabbit skin jacket and I still have it today. He did not like talking about the war. One story he did tell me, that the Russian solders were kept in separate huts from the rest of the troops in the camp.
The Germans were starving them and they were screaming out for food, the Germans sent their dogs into the huts, but they never came out.
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  #25  
Old 22-11-21, 08:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil2M View Post
My cousin gave me his anodised RE cap badge with some other bits and pieces. Mum decided they were all nasty and threw them all away, except the cap badge I had stored separately. As an eight year old I couldn't stop things getting binned whilst I was at school, it happened often and I still 31 years later hold a slight grudge.
I know that feeling very well. My father served in the Second World War in the Home Guard due to having pulmonary T.B. as a child. He was living in Woodmansterne, Surrey at the time and later told me about various incidents that he had witnessed, which included German air raids on Kenley Aerodrome and Croydon Airport. He told me about a huge crater left in a field in Woodmansterne by a German bomber and I can clearly remember cycling over to see the crater with my mate Tony Mitchell when I was about 9 or 10.

Around this time, I found a .303 cartridge on some waste ground by a public footpath and took it home to show my father. He cleaned the end of the cartridge with a wire brush and showed me the date, 1940. That was it for me, my first piece of actual history and I convinced myself that it was fired from a Spitfire during the Battle of Britain.

Like nine years olds do, I took it to school to show my mates and in the playground, a small group of kids had gathered round to see my treasure. The teacher supervising noticed and came over to see what everyone was looking at.

After all these years, I can clearly remember her asking me, "What have you got there?!. I showed her and said that it was a WW2 bullet from a Spitfire. She looked at me and said, "you don't want that" and took it from my hand and threw it over the hedge into the field next door.

I remember going back after school again and again to look for it but I never found it.

If, I had kept the cartridge, I may have got bored and moved onto to other interests, but I honestly think that losing that treasure at such an impressionable age set me off on my endless quest of trying to preserve random pieces of military history.

Either that, or I am on the Autistic Spectrum, as yet undiagnosed.
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  #26  
Old 22-11-21, 09:41 AM
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Thinking about the photo of me in my post, the full and half wings in the frame back left almost certainly came from the list of the legendary Bill Tobin.

The RAEC brass badge on the piece of black pegboard came from an Army and Navy shop on Byron Street, Liverpool. They had lots of cap badges for sale displayed in the window. A lot of the other badges had belonged to family and friends of the family.

On a few occasions my Dad took me to a Junk Shop in Myrtle Street, Liverpool. In there were large boxes full of all sorts of metal military badges of all kinds. With hindsight you could have made a fortune if you had bought selectively and even better no one had ever heard of restrikes and if they had been mentioned , why would they be needed when there were more than sufficient genuine badges to satisfy the collectors of the late 1950s- early 1960s

Golden days

P.
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  #27  
Old 22-11-21, 10:02 AM
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....my Grandfathers silver/gilt RAOC Cap badge in his old SD Cap. Cant remember what happened to both.... I was 9. Lost in time.
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  #28  
Old 22-11-21, 11:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High Wood View Post
I know that feeling very well. My father served in the Second World War in the Home Guard due to having pulmonary T.B. as a child. He was living in Woodmansterne, Surrey at the time and later told me about various incidents that he had witnessed, which included German air raids on Kenley Aerodrome and Croydon Airport. He told me about a huge crater left in a field in Woodmansterne by a German bomber and I can clearly remember cycling over to see the crater with my mate Tony Mitchell when I was about 9 or 10.

Around this time, I found a .303 cartridge on some waste ground by a public footpath and took it home to show my father. He cleaned the end of the cartridge with a wire brush and showed me the date, 1940. That was it for me, my first piece of actual history and I convinced myself that it was fired from a Spitfire during the Battle of Britain.

Like nine years olds do, I took it to school to show my mates and in the playground, a small group of kids had gathered round to see my treasure. The teacher supervising noticed and came over to see what everyone was looking at.

After all these years, I can clearly remember her asking me, "What have you got there?!. I showed her and said that it was a WW2 bullet from a Spitfire. She looked at me and said, "you don't want that" and took it from my hand and threw it over the hedge into the field next door.

I remember going back after school again and again to look for it but I never found it.

If, I had kept the cartridge, I may have got bored and moved onto to other interests, but I honestly think that losing that treasure at such an impressionable age set me off on my endless quest of trying to preserve random pieces of military history.

Either that, or I am on the Autistic Spectrum, as yet undiagnosed.
That reminds me of the cap that my cousin also gave to me. My friend's little brother threw it on to the porch roof and mum refused to get it down for me. It either blew away or the window cleaner stole it, I will never know. It was outside my bedroom window but I was too scared to jump down and get it

I fairly often think back at all the toys, gifts and books etc that got thrown away in my absence. I used to really look after my stuff too. She had a knack for getting rid of the stuff that I liked and/or held sentimental value to me whilst keeping the stuff I had little interest in.

Let's hope the casing your teacher threw over the fence helped somebody else find the collecting bug too.
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  #29  
Old 22-11-21, 11:50 AM
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Hello everybody

I remember very well my first find. Long time ago

I didn't know what it was.

This one..

JP
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  #30  
Old 22-11-21, 11:52 AM
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Phil,

the strange thing is that I must have found several dozen cartridge cases since that first one and I didn't have any signicant memories of any of them.

I am reminded of a line in one of the India Jones films where the eponymous hero meets up with his long divorced wife. I cannot remember the exact dialogue but it goes something like this.

Indiana: You were always the love of my life I never once stopped thinking about you.

Ex Mrs Jones. I heard that you had many women after me and yet you never settled down with any of them, perhaps you were the problem.

Indiana. Those women all had the same problem, they weren't you.
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