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  #1  
Old 29-09-17, 05:23 AM
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Default how best to display a collection

hi all
i am contemplating various ways to display the collection.
in the past i have done it according to cossums books. page by page, but are there any other ways you all do it?
for example, have considered doing it by State starting with the earliest through to modern. this would be good but then what do i do with the corps and unofficial and obscure units?
thought about lineage?
and then what about my side obsessions? i could do a display of all the different rising suns i have.
anyway, happy to have suggestions and hear how you all do it
cheers
bc
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  #2  
Old 30-09-17, 11:33 PM
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Hi BC,
You might like to start with displaying your rising suns, as that way you'll complete one display, and then you can move on to the next display
Cheers,
Invest

Last edited by Investment; 30-09-17 at 11:38 PM.
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  #3  
Old 30-09-17, 11:54 PM
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I find that including a period button, adds some depth to what your displaying.

Now to find those missing shoulder titles
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 11th ALHR hat and collar badges 1900 - 1912.jpg (30.3 KB, 82 views)

Last edited by Investment; 30-09-17 at 11:59 PM.
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  #4  
Old 01-10-17, 01:41 AM
Jackhr Jackhr is offline
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Looking forward to see the complete display

jack
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  #5  
Old 01-10-17, 02:44 AM
Lancer 17 Lancer 17 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Investment View Post
I find that including a period button, adds some depth to what your displaying.

Now to find those missing shoulder titles
G'day Investment

Very nice / jealous ! Thanks for sharing. I only have 1 collar.

Regards

Phil.
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  #6  
Old 01-10-17, 06:33 AM
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G'Day Bradley,

I asked myself very similar and related questions a couple of years after I began writing Volume 1 and 2 (which was originally intended to be a simple single volume work).

It seems obvious now, but it did take me a while to conclude that Corps insignia formed one layer of insignia... while Unit and Regiments formed another distinct strata of insignia... so when the book roughedout to 600 bloody pages... that's how the book content was cut into two manageable lots of material. This seemed better than publishing all Units and Regiments from a given Corps together... which simply led to very uneven blocks of content... and issues about formation 'precedence' etc etc, which didn't seem to be relevant to quick/random checks of the material (as collectors, historians and family members with service photos need to do for various reasons).

The next organisational/structural issue, was 'metal type and period of manufacture'. That pans out to: the gilt/white metal (and chrome/nickle) period items, then (generally) anodised/'Staybright' period items and then the 'BriteShine' period items...and/or 1953 to '64 and 1965 to '97 and 'post 97' periods. We decided that it made sense to put all the insignia from a given Corps and its Units/Regiments in the one place... so that differing variations of service-related insignia could be seen next to each other (in a chronological progression).

So now I'll get to the point... when we wrote the books, we used a specimen 'reference' collection which reflected the arrangement of the books and their numbering system (of course). At first, the specimen insignia were stored on pieces of manila card (stored in shoe boxes, no less and then later on, those same cards were slotted into plastic tracks mounted on large Masonite panels. That allowed quick rearrangement of items and easy visual access to everything, because the panels were hung in the hallway outside my study (where Arthur and I wrote the books).

After those reference/display arrangements were used for several years, I was offered a set of metal 'plan' storage drawers (the type used by architects and engineers). Those same metal drawer units are also used by paleontologists and other science types, to store and quickly view 'specimens' as well. The person who offered me the plan draws was already using them to store insignia... so I can't claim the insight of having re-purposed them for our sort of work... but then, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery isn't it

So after all that, here are the images of a post 1953 set of insignia, stored in plan drawers, following the numbering system used in Vol 1 and Vol2. Please note that:
  • some (rare) spare spaces in this 10 drawer set, have been stuffed with items that are out of order but in need of stowage (somewhere); and
  • the images are about 18 months old, so some of the items that made it into the books, are notably absent in these snap shots (such as the 6th Av hat and collar set and the 1 Av title etc etc etc); and

    variations that were important to the books, are generally stored to the right of the main set for each reference number... but sometimes because of space restrictions... they are all stored together; and
  • most items are stored face down... because the most compelling details in a reference collection (as distinct from a framed display), are typically on the back of most items, rather than on the front... however each drawer has APC anti-spall/impact cushion material lining the bottom... so badges which are stored face up, all have their pins embedded and protected; and finally
  • the collection now has most current issue specimens stored in their original issue (NSN) packaging... which would make more up to date pictures look more crowded (and so less useful for this post).
I hope this helps? Even if it only rules out a few time-wasting 'dry gullies' for you!

Regards
Mark
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Drawer 0.jpg (62.8 KB, 102 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 1.jpg (73.0 KB, 137 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 2.jpg (73.9 KB, 79 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 3.jpg (69.6 KB, 53 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 4.jpg (77.1 KB, 51 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 5.jpg (79.1 KB, 44 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 6.jpg (67.1 KB, 38 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 7.jpg (84.0 KB, 47 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 8.jpg (87.4 KB, 43 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 9.jpg (76.2 KB, 59 views)
File Type: jpg Drawer 10.jpg (82.5 KB, 70 views)
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Last edited by Mark Corcoran; 03-10-17 at 06:41 AM. Reason: my bad typing again :)
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  #7  
Old 01-10-17, 08:52 AM
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That's some collection Mark, no wonder you've been able to publish two volumes on it!
Keith
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  #8  
Old 01-10-17, 02:56 PM
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Wonderful collection Mark and a great way of organising them.

Can I ask what is the black material under the badges in each compartment?
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  #9  
Old 01-10-17, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fairlie63 View Post
That's some collection Mark, no wonder you've been able to publish two volumes on it!
Keith
Thanks Keith

I have to admit, not all is as neat as it seems On top of the cabinet are a pile of headdress items with their insignia in situ (e.g. band helmets, bonnets, Tam O'Shanters and of course KFF's with 'horse feathers' (or 'Roo feathers' and so forth.

Then there's the biscuit tins full of repro stuff that Arthur and I have each acquired over the years We might be some of the few people who have collections of Repro items... because the orange section at the back of each book attempts to catalogue those too. Most are obvious repros (cheap and cheerful gap fillers and plaque items etc) and so, not very likely to cause collectors to be mislead. We only devote a small amount of space to those items... just a representative smattering really. However, some specimens really are works of 'evil genius' and take (me) some time and a good magnifying glass to confidently rule 'in' or 'out'. It is in identifying those competently and deliberately misleading items that we think new collectors need to be made aware of.

Finally, the reference collection not only includes the traditional 3 R's (i.e. 'Rogues, Repros and Regimental Shop items')... we've also extended that to include "Rejected pattern items" as well. Insignia which fall into that 4th category include all types of 'trial strikes'... such as the first pattern of the 'Deakin Uni Regiment' (@ CB 300 and CB 300R) and many more recent items, such as the 6th Av hat badge with red enamel instead of black enamel and different sizes of the 1st CDO, SOER and SOLS insignia and so on. The closer we get to the Army's OEM supply chain... the more of those we find and record.

The upshot is, that instead of monitoring the 3 R's, we are now tracking 4R's So the 'RRRR' collection could really do with another 5 to 10 drawers I think.

In the end, I guess that like all collectors, its the thrill of the hunt that I find addictive... and the chance to 'talk shop' with other people who have outstanding (and far better) collections of their own.

Keith, I'm sure that you have a Reference Collection for your work as well?

Regards
Mark
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Last edited by Mark Corcoran; 02-10-17 at 05:36 AM.
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  #10  
Old 01-10-17, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wooffy View Post
Wonderful collection Mark and a great way of organising them.

Can I ask what is the black material under the badges in each compartment?
No probs!

Each drawer has APC anti-spall/impact cushion material lining the bottom... so badges which are stored face up, all have their pins embedded and protected in that firm sponge material. Meanwhile, the badges which are stored face down (for quick identification of different variations), also have the benefit of being protected from scuffing on their face.

Just in case you wanted to know... the black (windowed) mats which form a border between each set, are made out of APC floor matting... which was carefully cut out with a Stanley knife and then overlaid on the backing foam mats (making a raised border between each set).

Having said that, if I ever have to do up another of these drawer sets... then I'll be going to a picture framer and asking to have cardboard mats cut up into pairs of 'windowed' overlay panels (probably using two such panels to a drawer). I'd probably also go to Clark Rubber or similar supplier for custom cut sheets of 15mm thick medium density foam (preferably in a green colour), to use as an underlay (to protect badges, whether stored face up or face down as required). I've also seen other people's collection with coloured cotton run between rows of foam embedded pins, so that a grid pattern is present between all displayed insignia sets.

Finally, I have found that secondhand furniture and office equipment dealers do sell plan draw sets fairly cheaply. A couple of hundred bucks should pick up a large 10 draw unit in good condition. The trick is to have a ute to transport the unit... because most station wagons are simply not going to be wide enough to handle the job properly. You will also need someone to help you to lug the unit into position when you arrive at your destination. Oh and a table or bench space which you are prepared to lose access to FOREVER, is required before the unit arrives... sitting the unit on the ground would be the pits.

I hope these ideas are a help to someone as well.

Happy researching and collecting all!


Mark Corcoran
0411074685
corcoran@bigpond.net.au
charliebravobooks.com
Co Author of: “Metal Uniform Embellishments of the Australian Army”
Post 1953 (the QEII era) Vol 1 and Vol 2
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Last edited by Mark Corcoran; 08-10-17 at 11:53 PM.
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  #11  
Old 02-10-17, 04:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Corcoran View Post

i Oh and a table or bench space which you are prepared to lose access to FOREVER, is required before the unit arrives... sitting the unit on the ground would be the pits.

Mark
It would help of course if I could talk the wife into moving all her scrapbooking stuff into her caravan and leave me some (all of the) space in the study for a plan drawer and wall displays but having just got out of plaster after the last time I made that simple suggestion...
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  #12  
Old 02-10-17, 05:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancer 17 View Post
G'day Investment

Very nice / jealous ! Thanks for sharing. I only have 1 collar.
Your welcome Phil
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  #13  
Old 02-10-17, 05:25 AM
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LOL

Go straight to the dog house, do not pass go
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  #14  
Old 09-09-19, 09:40 AM
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Thanks for the tips guys - now looking for a plan drawer for my stuff...
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  #15  
Old 09-09-19, 10:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Investment View Post
I find that including a period button, adds some depth to what your displaying.

Now to find those missing shoulder titles
Interesting! The collar badges were worn by the Glossop Borough Police. They also used them as a cap badge. Apologies for (slightly) highjacking the thread.

Dave.
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