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Old 04-08-14, 08:56 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Default A, B, C & RDs of New Zealand Reinforcement Badges.

Today, the 4th of August 2014, is the 100 year anniversary of Great Britain declaring war on Germany.
Interestingly, New Zealand had already made the following commitment on the 31st July 1914. —
“If occasion arises and it may New Zealand Government will ask Parliament and the people of New Zealand to do their duty by offering services of Expeditionary Force to the Imperial Government.”

On Wednesday, 5th August 1914, at 12.15 pm New Zealand time, a “secret cypher telegram” was received by the Governor of New Zealand, which stated. —
“War has broken out with Germany.”
Two hours later at 3 pm, on the steps of Parliament in Wellington, the Governor Lord Liverpool and Prime Minister W. F. Massey announce to the New Zealand public the outbreak of war with Germany.
71 days later, on the 15th of October 1914, a NZ Expeditionary Force of 7,761 men and Reinforcements of 738 men embarked from New Zealand.

To honour such a significant event in New Zealand history, I thought I would take a crack at providing a better understanding of New Zealand Reinforcement badges.
I have loads of information to share, but unfortunately time is not so abundant, so it’s going to have to be a work in progress, as I can, when I can.

Just to start the ball rolling, and to help those who have no understanding of NZ Reinforcements, the following article was published in the Wellington Dominion Newspaper two days after the war ended on the 13th November 1918. —
"The announcement that war had begun reached the Dominion on August 5, 1914, and on that day the Prime Minister (Right Hon. W. F. Massey) moved in the House of Representatives:—
That in view of the fact that Great Britain has become involved in war with Germany, this House approves of the necessary steps being taken by the New Zealand Government to have in readiness an Expeditionary Force.
This motion was passed unanimously, and the Defence Department proceeded at once with the arrangements. Recruits were offering in thousands, and the authorities were able to make a selection, they gave preference first to members of the Territorial Force and then to men who had had previous military experience. Improvised camps Began to fill quickly, instructional staffs were arranged, and the provision of transport was undertaken.

The actual strength of the Main Body when it left New Zealand was 7761 men. It was accompanied by the First Reinforcement, numbering 738 men, so that the total strength of the force that left New Zealand on October 15, 1914, was 8499 men. The recruiting of the Main Body was based upon the Territorial organisation, each mounted rifle regiment providing a squadron and each infantry regiment a company. Thus each military district provided a mounted rifle regiment and an infantry battalion named after the district from which it was drawn. The Territorial organisation has been maintained throughout the war, the exception being the Rifle Brigade, which was a new departure.

The Main Body first left New Zealand on September 25, 1914, but they were ordered back to port. The German armed forces in the Pacific were a menace and the authorities did not consider that the escort then available was adequate. The troops resumed their training ashore until the arrival of the British cruise Minotaur and the Japanese cruiser Ibuki. Then the men were re-embarked on October 15, and early the next morning the transports put to sea. The destination of the troops was not known to the public of New Zealand at that time. It was learned later that the men had gone lo Egypt, where they continued their training and prepared for the great ordeal of Gallipoli. The Main Body, according to the promise made by the New Zealand Government, was to be reinforced regularly and adequately during the period of the war. The rate of reinforcement varied from time to lime, but it is a proud boast that the drafts never failed. There was a shortage of reinforcements in the early days on Gallipoli, when the casualties were outrunning all expectation and preparation. Big drafts were sent away to meet that position, and there was never a shortage of reinforcements for the New Zealand units at any other stage of the campaign.

The first big increase in the strength of the Expeditionary Force was made at this end. The Government, in April, 1915, decided upon the creation of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade, with some additional artillery, including a howitzer battery. The organisation of the Brigade went ahead rapidly, and the first two battalions sailed from New. Zealand on October 9, 1915, with a strength of 2250 men. The 3rd and 4th Battalions followed early in February, l916, and numbered 2111 men. The Rifle Brigade, like the Main Body, was to be reinforced monthly for the duration of the war."
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Old 08-08-14, 02:33 PM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Now I would firstly like to point out that I am no expert when it comes to NZ Reinforcement badges, but then again I am no novice. Much of my knowledge is drawn from NZ badge books, and it is Geoffrey Lowe’s book “New Zealand Reinforcement Badges 1914-1918” that has helped me the most when it comes to putting Reinforcement badges into a logical order, so much of my own research is inspired by what Geoffrey Lowe wrote over 27 years ago.

Lowe’s book was never intended to explore relative rarity of NZ Reinforcement Badges, so in order to further my own understanding I contacted owners of two of the oldest badge collections in New Zealand. The first collector was Laurie Osborne whose badge collection is legendary among NZ badge collectors, and Laurie is also one of the few people who originally supplied badges and information for Lowe’s book. The second collector who has also unstintingly provided me with photos of his rare reinforcements badges is fellow forum member Tinto.
Without their help this thread this thread would not have been possible.

However, to really truly understand the beginnings of NZ Reinforcement badges we need to start with. — Who were the first Camp Jewellers at Trentham Camp? As this is where the first reinforcement badges were manufactured and worn.

The first Camp Jeweller to set up shop at Trentham Camp was Horace William Lloyd who was the Michael Hill Jeweller of his day.

Horace Lloyd had learnt his trade as a watchmaker, jeweller, and optician in England, and had worked in Cheapside, London, before moving to New Zealand and taking up employment with W. Littlejohn & Son, who were jewellers located at 85 Lambton-quay in Wellington.
Lloyd with around 15 years’ experience opened his own first jewellery shop at 65 Lambton-quay in 1897.

The second Camp Jeweller to set up shop at Trentham Camp appears to have been Arnold Ashworth Binns.

Interestingly, back in late September 1912, Arnold Binns was employed by Horace Lloyd to manage his jewellers shop located at 114 Cuba Street in Wellington. Unfortunately for Lloyd, Binns had a bad gambling problem, and had resorted to pawning and selling jewellery from the shop to fund his addiction. Binns had gambled that with a win he could return the items he had taken, but luck was not on his side, and only 9 months after he was employed as manager, Binns was arrested and charged with 13 counts of theft of jewellery with a retail value of £165. (Binns salary was £4 a week)
Binns pleaded guilty and was committed to the Supreme Court for sentence.
The total loss to Horace Lloyd was finally calculated at £86, and just prior to sentencing, a draft of £100 had been cabled from Binns family in England to make good on the value of the articles stolen.
His Honour the Chief Justice Sir Robert Stout was on the Bench when Binns was sentenced on the 18th of August 1913, and passing what he considered to be a very light sentence, gave Binns a sentence of eight months imprisonment with hard labour.


The following advert is dated the 20th October 1915.

Last edited by atillathenunns; 29-07-17 at 01:15 AM.
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Old 08-08-14, 08:32 PM
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Hi Brent,

Firstly let me say you have embarked on a very worthwhile project and I will watch this thread with interest. Thanks for your kind mention, I'm sure there are other Reinforcement collectors who would be willing to help.

In regard to the Trentham Camp shop, my father told me that when he was at the Camp in the early 1920's on a Senior Cadet Course, he found this shop locked up but looking through the windows could see many badges suspended on wires from the ceiling. You have to wonder what became of those.

All the Best,
Tinto
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Old 12-08-14, 10:57 AM
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Tinto, I don’t have all the answers, but some answers with a touch of speculation are better than nothing at all.

“The advantages of Reinforcements, apart from making good wastage in the field, were obvious. They are. —
(1) The improvement of the morale of the existing troops by the knowledge that on due date their losses will be repaired (nothing is so disheartening to armies in the field as evidence of constantly vanishing strength)
(2) The absorption of the recruits among an invariably much larger proportion of seasoned veterans and placing them under experienced officers
(3) Preservation of the Regimental traditions won during the various military campaigns. The result, in effect, is the creation of a veteran army, as the newcomers, trained up to a certain standard before being absorbed among the seasoned troops, soon become veterans themselves.”
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Old 17-08-14, 12:56 AM
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Photograph taken in Christchurch by Adam Henry Pearson Maclay, of an unidentified couple. The soldier is wearing brass (Type No. 28) 21st Reinforcement cap badge and collar badges featuring the NZ Fantail bird.



The lady is wearing what looks to me to be a sterling silver (Type No. 28) 21st Reinforcement sweethearts badge, and a locket with a photo of the soldier.







The 21st Reinforcement collar badge design (Rd 892) was officially registered on the 12th September 1916, and the 21st Reinforcement cap badge design (Rd894) was officially registered on the 14th September 1916, and both were officially registered to a Mr H. F. Edgecumbe of Mayer & Kean, who were ‘General Engravers and Die Sinkers’ and were located at 4 Willis Street in Wellington.
(The 21st Reinforcements embarked on the 19th January 1917)

Last edited by atillathenunns; 29-07-17 at 01:38 AM.
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Old 17-08-14, 09:25 AM
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Due to other collecting habits I am a bit of a late starter when it comes to NZ Reinforcement badges, and the following triple fern badge picture is literally the very first NZ Reinforcement badge that I collected. (At the time it was my 2nd most expensive badge purchase)



Geoffrey Lowe’s badge book was “compiled from photographic evidence of the badges having been worn on actual uniforms, - rather than from badges existing in individual collections.”
Unfortunately Lowe’s book does not include a picture of a ‘triple fern badge’ being worn, and has only dedicated one short paragraph describing the (Type No. 1) triple fern badge.

Fortunately for us speculators of brass metals, photographic evidence of a triple fern hat badge was discovered and commented on by fellow forum member Pukman on the 16th November 2009.
The picture shows Trooper Robert Scott from Longridge in Southland, who embarked with the Otago Mounted Rifles 6th reinforcements on the 14th August 1915.


Trooper Scott was the first piece of the puzzle, and with focus drawn on the 6th and 7th Reinforcements, more triple fern photograhs were uncovered, adding enough evidence to make a reasonable speculation that the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Reinforcements triple fern badges were simply modified excess badges (As first worn by the 6th and 7th Reinforcements) that were purposely altered for the collectors market.

In all, there appears to be 4 variations/patterns of triple fern badges, my own 1st Reinforcements triple fern badge rates as a 3rd Pattern- made for the collectors market.
The following triple fern badge from Tintos collection, rates as a 1st Pattern badge – and was worn by men of the 6th and 7th Reinforcements.
On the back of the badge is the letters “C.B” for C. M. Bay of Willis Street, who was the manufacturer of this badge.



The second and most important piece of the puzzle is the collection of NZ Reinforcement badges featured on page 17 of the book Historic Trentham, which was written by Will Lawson (New Zealands leading poet at the time) and printed by the Wellington Publishing company. (First edition was released on the 1st September 1917)
The collection of NZ Reinforcement badges (page 17) is credited to Mr Elden S. Neill and appears to have been photographed around May 1917.



In order to successfully analyse the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Reinforcements triple fern badges, as well as other early reinforcement badges that are displayed in the collection credited to Mr Elden S. Neill, we need to understand who Elden S. Neill is?

This brings us full circle to our two first Trentham Camp jewellers, Horace William Lloyd and Arnold Ashworth Binns, who were undoubtedly the two of the main players when it came to NZ Reinforcement badges.

As mentioned earlier Horace William Lloyd was the Michael Hill Jeweller of his day, that is, he would open a store, stock it with fine jewellery, and employ a suitably qualified manager to run it for him.
To manage his shop at Trentham Camp Horace Lloyd employed Mr E. Looser, who before moving to New Zealand, had done his apprenticeship (about six years) as a watchmaker in London, and then gained further experience in leading watchmaking houses in Europe, particularly in Lucerne (Switzerland) and then in Nice (France).

Arnold Ashworth Binns also employed a manager to run his shop at Trentham Camp.
Arnold Binns employed Elden S. Neill as his manager.

Last edited by atillathenunns; 29-07-17 at 01:58 AM.
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Old 18-08-14, 07:54 AM
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Hello,
In regard to the 21st reinforcements design, Is it a Fantail? as the beak looks far too long, especially on the Cap badge where it is almost as long as the wing it self.
I always thought them as being based on the female(cap) and male(collar) Huia.
As per the attached images.
Please solve this mystery for me as I would love to know if the designer had documented the name of the bird when registered.
Cheers
Corey
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Huia_Buller.jpg (64.7 KB, 28 views)
File Type: jpg 21stReinforcements_zpsa25fea42.jpg (68.1 KB, 30 views)
File Type: jpg Huia in flight.jpg (24.3 KB, 21 views)

Last edited by Corey; 19-08-14 at 10:24 AM.
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Old 18-08-14, 08:31 PM
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I would tend to agree with Corey that the design is off a Huia rather than a fantail .

I have uncovered two identified photo's of soldiers wearing the ''triple fern '' that are 8th reinforcements .
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Old 19-08-14, 09:49 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey View Post
Hello,
In regard to the 21st reinforcements design, Is it a Fantail? as the beak looks far too long, especially on the Cap badge where it is almost as long as the wing it self.
I always thought them as being based on the male(cap) and female(collar) Huia.
As per the attached images.
Please solve this mystery for me as I would love to know if the designer had documented the name of the bird when registered.
Cheers
Corey
Hi Corey,
The reference — “(Type No. 28)” and “NZ Fantail bird” — were both taken from the description of 21st Reinforcement badges on page 18, of Geoffrey Lowe’s book ‘NZ Reinforcement Badges.’

I hope this solves your mystery.

Last edited by atillathenunns; 29-07-17 at 02:05 AM.
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Old 19-08-14, 09:50 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pukman View Post
I would tend to agree with Corey that the design is off a Huia rather than a fantail .

I have uncovered two identified photo's of soldiers wearing the ''triple fern '' that are 8th reinforcements .
Puk, please do post your two identified 8th Reinforcements triple fern badge photos
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Old 19-08-14, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atillathenunns View Post
Hi Corey,
The reference — “(Type No. 28)” and “NZ Fantail bird” — were both taken from the description of 21st Reinforcement badges on page 18, of Geoffrey Lowe’s book ‘NZ Reinforcement Badges.’

I hope this solves your mystery.
Hmmmm...not really
Would love to have seen it written in the line marked "Description" that would be too easy.
If the design is meant to resemble a NZ Fantail... (Rhipidura fuliginosa) I would ask him to try again
Would it be possible to get the beak and body shape so wrong?
I wouldn't think so as the fine detail that is shown in all the reo badges in outstanding.
The 21st Cap badge & Collar also shows a distinctive line marking the tips of the tail feathers, a trait of the Huia but not found with a Fantail.
They do however share a tail that can fan out as in the image shown in post 7.
Nothing against the Fantail!
Sorry if it seems I am highjacking the thread, The only stupid question is the one not asked
Cheers
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Bullers_fantails.jpg (61.0 KB, 15 views)
File Type: jpg 21stReinforcements_zpsa25fea42.jpg (68.1 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg Huia_Buller.jpg (64.7 KB, 6 views)

Last edited by Corey; 22-08-14 at 08:03 AM.
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Old 19-08-14, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atillathenunns View Post
Puk, please do post your two identified 8th Reinforcements triple fern badge photos
Brent ,here's one for a start
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File Type: jpg attachment.jpg (47.4 KB, 48 views)
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Old 21-08-14, 07:27 AM
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Smile 1st Reinforcements

The 1st Reinforcements badge

Is there any evidence, that this badge was worn out side in the field, or on the ships, transporting the troops to Sling camp? Photos would be great!
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Old 24-08-14, 08:02 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey View Post
Hmmmm...not really
Would love to have seen it written in the line marked "Description" that would be too easy.
If the design is meant to resemble a NZ Fantail... (Rhipidura fuliginosa) I would ask him to try again
Would it be possible to get the beak and body shape so wrong?
I wouldn't think so as the fine detail that is shown in all the reo badges in outstanding.
The 21st Cap badge & Collar also shows a distinctive line marking the tips of the tail feathers, a trait of the Huia but not found with a Fantail.
They do however share a tail that can fan out as in the image shown in post 7.
Nothing against the Fantail!
Sorry if it seems I am highjacking the thread, The only stupid question is the one not asked
Cheers
Corey, my Great grandfather embarked with the 21st Mounted Rifle Reinforcements, and interestingly enough, the set of 21st Infantry Reinforcement badges (post #5) are the only set of Infantry Reinforcement collar badges that I actually own.

IMO, the extra long beak on the 21st cap badge, and the tail feather tips of the 21st collar badges suggested to me the bird depicted is the Huia. However, having shown the badges to the wife and three friends, all four identified the cap badge as being a fan tail, and the collar badges varied between a Tui (3) and backbird (1), so I decided to go with Lowe’s description and introduce them as a “NZ Fantail bird.”

Until someone comes up with conclusive evidence, the bird depicted should be described as a ‘New Zealand native bird, possibly a Huia or a Fantail.’
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Old 24-08-14, 08:04 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pukman View Post
Brent ,here's one for a start
Puk, one photograph is enough to prove that the 6th 7th and now the 8th Reinforcements were the first Reinforcements to wear the 1st and 2nd Pattern Triple Fern badges

For those who are not familiar with the 2nd Pattern Triple Fern badge, the following picture is from the renowned collection of Craig Hooper.



Also from the same thread that was started back in November 2009, is a photograph from Matt Pomeroy showing a 2nd Pattern Triple Fern badge being worn.



Last edited by atillathenunns; 29-07-17 at 02:14 AM.
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