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  #1  
Old 30-09-21, 03:26 PM
arrestingu arrestingu is offline
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Default 47th Foot Pork Pie hat badge & brass Sergeant stripes.

Thought I would like to share these with you ,can anyone confirm where these Sergeant stripes would have been worn.
Both badges were originally found together .
Regards
Steve
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File Type: jpg PXL_20210930_144047149~2.jpg (66.6 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg PXL_20210930_144107356~2.jpg (93.8 KB, 35 views)
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  #2  
Old 30-09-21, 07:20 PM
jf42 jf42 is offline
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Regulations only authorised the regimental number to be worn on the 1834 Kilmarnock forage cap, with grenade or bugle horn emblems where appropriate for flank companies, fusilier and light infantry regiments.

Forage caps continued to be something of a law unto themselves, however, and amongst the various deviations to be found was the occasional wearing of sergeants' chevrons above the number. It's not easy to turn up many examples. One sergeant of the 65th LI company in New Zealand was photographed with chevrons between the number and the bugle horn emblem (see top left). It's not a particulary good 'look.'

If that is the function served by your set of chevrons, above regimental identifier is where it would have been placed. Between 1850 and 1870 the 47th spent only four years 'at home' so its quite feasible that NCOs may have had some freedom to flout regulations regarding badges on forage caps
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  #3  
Old 30-09-21, 08:08 PM
arrestingu arrestingu is offline
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Wonderful , thank you for your time and effort and great picture !!
Regards
Steve
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  #4  
Old 30-09-21, 08:19 PM
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Luke H Luke H is offline
 
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Fascinating, thanks.
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  #5  
Old 30-09-21, 09:05 PM
jf42 jf42 is offline
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I hope it was helpful. I can claim no credit for the image. It was compiled by a fellow member of the now, sadly, defunct Victorian Wars Forum for a discussion about the Kilmarnock forage cap, aka 'pork pie' ( a term frowned on by that community...). His interest focusses on HM regiments in New Zealand during the 1860s, especially the 65th. QED.
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  #6  
Old 30-09-21, 09:48 PM
jf42 jf42 is offline
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I am going to have to recant. I had a niggling doubt, and here is the full photograph, temporarily misplaced, from which the above image was made and the bugler drummer on the left appears to be the only man not wearing sergeant's stripes. So, whatever he is wearing between his regimental number and the bugle horn, it is unlikely to be sergeant's stripes. Not least because none of the men displaying sergeant's stripes have attached a similar emblem to their caps.

What that blurred emblem might in fact be, I shall have to enquire.

As compensation, I attach an earlier photograph, very early, of a Royal Marines sergeant from the 1840s, who is definitely wearing sergeant's chevrons on his forage cap, albeit not a Kilmarnock..
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File Type: jpg 65th Light Coy ca 1858.jpg (34.3 KB, 37 views)
File Type: jpg Royal Marine circa 1840s?.jpg (84.0 KB, 44 views)
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  #7  
Old 01-10-21, 05:24 AM
arrestingu arrestingu is offline
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Thank you again , wonderful pictures indeed !!
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Old 01-10-21, 01:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jf42 View Post
Regulations only authorised the regimental number to be worn on the 1834 Kilmarnock forage cap, with grenade or bugle horn emblems where appropriate for flank companies, fusilier and light infantry regiments.

Forage caps continued to be something of a law unto themselves, however, and amongst the various deviations to be found was the occasional wearing of sergeants' chevrons above the number. It's not easy to turn up many examples. One sergeant of the 65th LI company in New Zealand was photographed with chevrons between the number and the bugle horn emblem (see top left). It's not a particulary good 'look.'

If that is the function served by your set of chevrons, above regimental identifier is where it would have been placed. Between 1850 and 1870 the 47th spent only four years 'at home' so its quite feasible that NCOs may have had some freedom to flout regulations regarding badges on forage caps
The the triumverate of badges or the beard?


Chris
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