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  #1  
Old 06-01-20, 06:54 PM
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Default Royal Artilley badge

Good evening,

I think it could be a blazer badge (10 x 10 cm) but is it British ?

Laurent
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  #2  
Old 06-01-20, 07:29 PM
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Would be a bit big for a headdress badge.
Andy
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  #3  
Old 06-01-20, 08:43 PM
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I think you are right, I would think it may well have been made in Great Britain, it certainly represents the British RA.

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Originally Posted by Anjoucollector View Post
Good evening,

I think it could be a blazer badge (10 x 10 cm) but is it British ?

Laurent
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  #4  
Old 07-01-20, 04:07 PM
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Personally I would tag it as Australian.

Marc
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  #5  
Old 12-01-20, 09:42 AM
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Thank you for your advice. I have never seen before a mix of blue and red on a RA badge

Laurent
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  #6  
Old 13-01-20, 12:06 AM
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Neither have I here in Canada. (Yet)!
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  #7  
Old 16-01-20, 10:37 AM
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A note of caution. There were a huge number of manufacturers in the past when compared with today and there were a surprising degree of manufacturers variations. London and Birmingham had many workshops producing such badges in bullion wire, and Lancashire was famous for less expensive types using coloured silks. Today there are very few made in the remaining U.K. workshops and the vast majority are made in Pakistan, China and Bangladesh. Queen Elizabeth has been the Sovereign since 1953, which I fully realise will be well known here, but my point is that virtually all the decline that I mention above has been during her reign, so the presence of a Saint Edward’s Crown on subject badge can be misleading. It could well be a British made badge, but from an obscure and long gone maker.

Last edited by Toby Purcell; 16-01-20 at 10:43 AM.
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  #8  
Old 16-01-20, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toby Purcell View Post
A note of caution. There were a huge number of manufacturers in the past when compared with today and there were a surprising degree of manufacturers variations. London and Birmingham had many workshops producing such badges in bullion wire, and Lancashire was famous for less expensive types using coloured silks. Today there are very few made in the remaining U.K. workshops and the vast majority are made in Pakistan, China and Bangladesh. Queen Elizabeth has been the Sovereign since 1953, which I fully realise will be well known here, but my point is that virtually all the decline that I mention above has been during her reign, so the presence of a Saint Edward’s Crown on subject badge can be misleading. It could well be a British made badge, but from an obscure and long gone maker.
I was going by the style of the piece (Cannon).

Marc
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  #9  
Old 16-01-20, 06:07 PM
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The decline is a very sad state of affairs.

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Originally Posted by Toby Purcell View Post
A note of caution. There were a huge number of manufacturers in the past when compared with today and there were a surprising degree of manufacturers variations. London and Birmingham had many workshops producing such badges in bullion wire, and Lancashire was famous for less expensive types using coloured silks. Today there are very few made in the remaining U.K. workshops and the vast majority are made in Pakistan, China and Bangladesh. Queen Elizabeth has been the Sovereign since 1953, which I fully realise will be well known here, but my point is that virtually all the decline that I mention above has been during her reign, so the presence of a Saint Edward’s Crown on subject badge can be misleading. It could well be a British made badge, but from an obscure and long gone maker.
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  #10  
Old 17-01-20, 01:29 AM
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Indeed, the quality of hand embroidered badges, whether metal or cotton, has plummeted to a very poor state in the past 50 or 60 years.
As Toby has mentioned, little has been made in the UK during this period and perhaps none of recent years.
In my opinion, the badge in question is likely of 60s or 70s vintage. After that, Mylar was typically used, an even further decline in quality of materials.

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  #11  
Old 17-01-20, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 54Bty View Post
I was going by the style of the piece (Cannon).

Marc
Yes, I can see exactly what you mean, Marc, and you may well be right, although I’ve seen all manner of variations over the years, both in colouration and design. Some small batches made up by obscure workshops in places such as Hong Kong and Singapore (native embroiderers by hand), were made up using cap badges or old drawings for inspiration (some of them Victorian), and with no knowledge of the correct colours to use.

Last edited by Toby Purcell; 17-01-20 at 01:45 PM.
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  #12  
Old 22-01-20, 09:55 PM
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Pedant alert.

I was going by the style of the piece (Cannon).

Yes and yes, but usually known as a gun in official badge publications such as the PVCNs, Clothing Regs and RACD ledgers that I have seen.
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  #13  
Old 25-01-20, 04:56 PM
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I always refer to the standard RA cap badge as the gun pattern notwithstanding, a cannon is certainly a type of gun.
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