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  #31  
Old 29-01-15, 11:05 PM
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An unidentified Rifleman from Nelson ,wearing ELO2(Earl of Liverpool's Own,2nd Battalion) cap badge Oldham's 4/175
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  #32  
Old 22-02-15, 01:53 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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The most helpful guide when it comes to dates of embarkations of NZEF Infantry Reinforcements, is presented on page 11 of Geoffrey Lowe’s NZ Reinforcement badge book.

To provide a better understanding about the flow of New Zealand Reinforcements for the period of 1914 to 1915, I have put together a slightly modified Reinforcement embarkation table, which is based on strength figures published in November 1918.

I have also included dates of when the men of each reinforcement draft arrived into Trentham, however, it should be noted that the officers and NCOs for each reinforcement draft would have arrived 2 to 4 weeks ahead of the men.

Units not trained at Trentham include the NZ British Section, which was trained in England, and the 1st Maori Contingent which trained at a camp set up at Avondale racecourse in Auckland, arriving into camp on the 21st October 1914.
The 2nd Maori Contingent trained at a camp set up at Narrow Neck in Takapuna, Auckland, arriving into camp on the 1st July 1915.
The NZ Tunnelling Company trained at a camp set up at Avondale racecourse in Auckland, arriving into camp on the 06 October 1915.

..........………………………………Arrived Trentham…….......Embarked….....Strength
Samoa Advance Party ...........……………………………………….15 Aug 1914..…..1419
Samoa Reinforcements and Reliefs to the 18 Oct 1918…………..………….......648
Main Body…………………………………………………...................15 Oct 1914.....…7761
1st Reinforcements………………………………………….............15 Oct 1914…….....738
2nd Reinforcements………………….21 Oct 1914……………...14 Dec 1914….....1974
3rd Reinforcements………………….14 Dec 1914……………...14 Feb 1915……...1712
1st Maori Contingent…………………………………………...........14 Feb 1915…….....518
4th Reinforcements………………….12 Jan 1915……………....17 Apr 1915……...2261
5th Reinforcements………………….15 Feb 1915……………....13 Jun 1915……...2411
6th Reinforcements………………….16 Mar 1915……………....14 Aug 1915……..2364
6th Reinforcements (balance) ……………………………….......19 Sep 1915…...…….85
2nd Maori Contingent ………………………………………............19 Sep 1915….…...311
Advance Party 1st + 2nd NZRB……………………………........19 Sep 1915…….....102
1st + 2nd Battalions NZRB………29 May 1915……………...09 Oct 1915……....2250
7th Reinforcements………………….12 Jun 1915……………....09 Oct 1915……....2450
8th Reinforcements………………….23 Aug 1915……………...14 Nov 1915…......2576
NZ Tunnelling Company……………………………………............18 Dec 1915…….....416
Tunnelling Reinforcements and Reliefs to the 18 Oct 1918…………………........862


The NZ British Section of the NZEF formed in England went into Bulford Camp on the Salisbury Plains on the 4 Oct 1914. On the 12 December 247 members of the British Section entrained at Bulford siding for Southampton bound for Alexandria, arriving at Zeitoun Camp on Christmas Eve.
On the 25 December 1914, the British Section was used to form the First Field Company of NZ Engineers under Captain Simson, and about 100 other ranks under Captain Lampen joined the NZASC.
A British Section rear-party of 6 other ranks under Lieutenant May remained in London manning an equipment depot until the 16 Jan 1915. “A week later the rear-party, whose strength had increased as more New Zealanders enlisted in London, sailed for Egypt from Swansea on the Port Lincoln. They arrived on 5 Feb and were posted to the NZASC.”


The following NZVC embarkation table is from a NZVC badge thread I posted on the New Zealand Mounted Rifles forum.
http://www.nzmr.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=635
It helps provide a breakdown of the NZVC embarkations that were included with each reinforcement draft.

1914—…………………………................Embarkation Date………Strength.
Main Body……………………….............15th Oct. 1914…………….......10
2nd Reinforcements………………......14th Dec. 1914…………........250
3rd Reinforcements……………….......14th Feb. 1915…………….......27
4th Reinforcements……………….......17th April 1915…………..........3
5th Reinforcements……………….......13th June 1915…………........14
6th Reinforcements……………….......14th Aug. 1915…………........11
7th Reinforcements……………….......9th Oct. 1915……………........14
8th Reinforcements……………….......14th Nov. 1915…………........38

Last edited by atillathenunns; 25-02-15 at 06:45 AM.
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  #33  
Old 14-03-15, 07:00 AM
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Major General Alfred William Robin (Commandant of the NZ Military Forces 10th Sept 1914 - 10th Dec 1919) in his letter dated 26th February 1916 (Post #21), describes the idea of evolving from unofficial Reinforcement badges to a universal Expeditionary Force badge.

To better understand the why, how, when and who of the early evolution of Reinforcement badges, one needs to understand how Trentham camp evolved, so I have taken the following extract from page 12 of the book “Historic Trentham,” written by Will Lawson and first published in 1917.

The Camp of Trentham

The old Camp's lights are burning still,
And brighter than before;
The rifle range below the hill,
Sends out the same old roar;
But you can't hear it, can you, Bill?
And you'll come back no more.


When war was declared by Great Britain against Germany, on August 4, 1914, there was no New Zealand Army, in the strict sense of the word. The outline of one existed, and the country had been fortunate in securing the services of some capable Imperial officers and n.c.o.'s for the training of her citizen army on a Territorial basis. The possibility of the Dominion ever finding it necessary to send an army overseas to fight bad been dreamed of by a few far-sighted military experts, but officially it had never been contemplated seriously. In spite of this, the military authorities faced, undismayed, the problem of mobilising and despatching seven thousand men without loss of time, and of training and sending reinforcements at regular intervals. And it is interesting to record that the first tents to be occupied by this army were pitched by civilians.

Within a week of the declaration of war, camps for mobilisation were established at Awapuni—where the people of Palmerston North provided fatigue parties to pitch the tents—Auckland, Christchurch, Dunedin, and Wellington. It was the beginning of a new phase of military work, a new military era in the Dominion. But these early camps were only temporary ones. Trentham, where the Dominion Rifle Association had its fine rifleranges, was in view all the time, and many of the Mounted Rifles of the Main Body completed their brief period of training at Trentham. Thus it has been identified with every draft which has gone overseas, except the Artillery, Mounted Rifles, Divisional Signallers, and A.S.C. drafts which mobilised after the new camp at Featherston had been built. Drafts of reinforcements for these branches of service are now trained wholly at Featherston.

The Main Body and the First Reinforcements sailed on October 14, 1914. On the same day, nearly three thousand recruits and huge quantities of camp equipment arrived at Trentham. The pitching of tents, under the direction of experienced men, was begun, while the issue of clothing and equipment was carried on well into the hours of darkness. The Camp

Quartermaster's stores and the supply store were in marquees. The only buildings were those connected with the rifle range, which included the present Expeditionary Force officers' mess, a portion of the present Headquarters, and a small hut. This hut afterwards became the post office. But the first post office at Trentham was in a marquee. As soon as the men entered camp they wanted to write home—it is a practice that is carried out to this day—and the New Zealand Post Office rose to the occasion then as it does to-day.

Day by day the new camp grew prodigiously. Until March, 1915, there were no new buildings put up. Then the building of the huts was put in hand, and the Trentham of to-day began to take shape. These huts were built by the Public Works Department according to plans prepared by the military authorities. But, for the time being, no formation of the ground into streets and pathways was begun, though the huts stood in rows, between which the present roads were eventually made. When the Camp was temporarily vacated in July, 1915, there were about fifty huts completed and in occupation.

All told, in tents and huts at that time there were eight thousand men in camp. Seven thousand of them were sent out in eight hours, with three days' rations per man. That took place on July 9. The 1st and 2nd Battalions of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade proceeded to Rangiotu; the 6th and 7th Mounted Rifles rode over the Rimutakas to Tauherenikau—an imposing cavalcade; the 7th Infantry went to Waikanae and the 6th Infantry remained at Trentham. None of these emergency camps were branches of Trentham. They were administered from Headquarters, Wellington, and of the three, Tauherenikau is the only one which has continued as a permanent camp, though Rangiotu was used until the 3rd and 4th Battalions of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade had completed their training and departed overseas.

Before the end of July, 1915, Trentham had resumed its busy appearance, but, for reasons of health, the number of men in camp was not allowed to exceed five thousand. On July 16 (a Friday) the Public Works officers went over the ground for the purpose of laying-off a draining and roading scheme. The whole area had to be surveyed, and this was sufficiently completed for large gangs of men to begin work on the Monday morning following. A steam plough and a large swamp plough were used to prepare the ground for the drains and water-channels, and numbers of horses and drays were employed, as well as nearly seven hundred men, for some weeks.

At the same time that the grading of the ground was undertaken, certain alterations in the ventilation of the existing huts was made, the new huts being built according to later plane. Every day new huts began to take shape, and as time went on the numbers of tents dwindled and the rows of huts grew. The tents were on the eastern parade-ground, where the 800-yards and 1,000-yards ranges were formerly; the huts were begun in the street behind Headquarters, and extended towards the railway. The removal of the tents and the upraising of the huts moved the Camp towards the railway. To-day it is right up to the boundary fence, and the only permanent tents in the Camp are those of the Engineers, which are built on specially drained and prepared ground.

The question of disposing of the surface-water and drainage from washing-places was one which engaged the attention of the engineers, and the plan which was decided upon and is now in operation provided for a large underground tank, into which the drains were led. This tank is capable of holding twenty-four hours' drainage, and at frequent intervals this accumulation is pumped under pressure to the Hutt River, nearly two miles away, where it discharges into a rapid current. The surface-water flows into a large deep drain, called in Camp parlance the Culebra Cut, which carries it away through Silverstream to the Hutt River at a point further down its stream. For the disposal of the solid waste matter of the Camp, large incinerators have been built, the pattern being one which was designed by the first Camp Quartermaster at Trentham.

It was after Trentham Camp had been in existence for twelve months that May Morn was made, to be an overflow camp in connection with the main camp. The site was at Mangaroa, a few miles north of Upper Hutt. Like the first camp at Trentham, May Morn was a canvas camp, the tents being of the Indian Service pattern. The only wooden buildings were the cook-houses, the Army Service Corps stores, the canteen, and shops and saloons. In every way May Morn was a model camp, especially as regards the sanitary arrangements. The 3rd and 4th Battalions of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade were the troops which first occupied May Morn. In December, 1915, they moved to Rangiotu, and the 11th Infantry Reinforcements then occupied the camp until it was closed in January, 1916.


Historic Trentham and other campaign histories and regimental histories covering New Zealand's involvement in the First World War can be viewed on the New Zealand Electronic Text Collection.
http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/schol...orpus-WH1.html
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  #34  
Old 14-03-15, 07:40 PM
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A few views of some of the camps mentioned .Professional photographer's made a profit taking photo's of the camp and selling them to the soldiers .
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File Type: jpg Camp ,Trentham early 1915 001.jpg (41.5 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg Camp ,Trentham 12.11.15 001.jpg (62.1 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg Camp ,Featherston 001.jpg (61.8 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg Camp ,Miramar 2 001.jpg (55.4 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg Camp,Miramar 001.jpg (46.3 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg Camp Awapuni 001.jpg (34.3 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg Camp,Awapuni 001.jpg (34.6 KB, 7 views)
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  #35  
Old 14-03-15, 07:43 PM
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A few more closer shots of Featherston or Trentham Camp
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File Type: jpg Camp 1 001.jpg (45.2 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg Camp 2 001.jpg (46.6 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg Camp 3 001.jpg (45.9 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg Camp 4 001.jpg (51.8 KB, 12 views)
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  #36  
Old 11-04-15, 12:06 AM
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Default Reinforcement badges 4 to 10

Reinforcements badges 4 to 10, I need images of, including soldiers wearing these badges.

As these reinforcements are very rare!
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  #37  
Old 16-04-15, 09:27 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnLynch View Post
Reinforcements badges 4 to 10, I need images of, including soldiers wearing these badges.

As these reinforcements are very rare!
Hi John, I have lots of photos of early reinforcement badges as well as period images of the reinforcements wearing these badges, and will be posting them on this thread hopefully in the near future. (I will post them in the order they were worn)
I will also try to provide some sort of understanding as to which camp jeweller was responsible for the design/production of the earliest reinforcement badges.
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  #38  
Old 19-04-15, 06:04 AM
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With the 100th anniversary of the 25 April 1915 Gallipoli landings only a few days away, It is worth considering.—
Who was the first New Zealand soldier to land on Gallipoli on the 25th?

Thanks to Frank Glen’s most excellent book, Bowler of Gallipoli, the answer is the Commanding Officer of the 2nd Reinforcements, Lieutenant-Colonel Edmund Robert Bowler was the first New Zealand soldier to land on Gallipoli.

Lieutenant-Colonel Edmund Bowler’s appointment as one of four Beach Landing Officers (BLO), placed him as responsible for the No. 1 section, the northern-most section of the beach.
Glen’s research places Bowler arriving ashore at 4.30am with the first troops from the Australian infantry, who were only preceded by the Australian covering party.
(New Zealand troops arrived approx. eight hours later)



Interestingly Bowler’s great-great-grand-daughter has been awarded the Gallipoli youth award from the AFS Intercultural programme.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/loca...-to-Anzac-Cove

It could be considered that the first New Zealander ashore was Bernard Freyberg VC., who on the evening of 24 April 1915, won his first DSO when he famously swam ashore at Bulair and set off flares to divert Turkish attention from the Gallipoli landings.

Firstly, Freyberg was not born in New Zealand, he was born in Richmond, Surrey, England on 21 March 1889, and moved to New Zealand with his parents at the age of two.
Freyberg’s military history is said to have stated with “school cadets at Wellington College (1897 to 1904)” and “from January 1913 served as a lieutenant in a senior cadet company.”
Christopher Pugsley, author of the Gallipoli the New Zealand story, mentions Freyberg served as a second lieutenant with the 6th Hauraki Regiment until 1914.

Secondly, Freyberg left Wellington for San Francisco in March 1914.—
“After some weeks of indecision, Freyberg went south to Mexico, and may have been involved in the civil war then raging in that country. Upon hearing of the outbreak of war in Europe in August 1914, however, he immediately set off for England.
Freyberg secured a commission in the newly formed Royal Naval Division’s Hood Battalion. He was gazetted as a temporary lieutenant in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, and given command of a company. By September 1914 he was on the Belgian front.”

Although Freyberg has claim to having lived most of his life in New Zealand, he was not a member of the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces during World War One.

Last edited by atillathenunns; 26-12-17 at 11:11 PM.
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  #39  
Old 03-05-15, 09:06 AM
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As a continuation to the Embarkation table in post # 32, the following is a ‘1914/1915’ Reinforcement Disembarkation table.

……………………………………......................Embarked…....Disembarked Egypt
Samoa Advance Party ……………..........15 Aug 1914…...29 Aug 1914 (Samoa)
Main Body………………………..................15 Oct 1914…….03 Dec 1914
1st Reinforcements………………............15 Oct 1914…….03 Dec 1914
2nd Reinforcements………………...........14 Dec 1914…...28 Jan 1915
3rd Reinforcements………………............14 Feb 1915…...26 Mar 1915
1st Maori Contingent…………….............14 Feb 1915……26 Mar 1915
1st Samoa Relief…………………..............27 Mar 1915…..03 Apr 1915 (Samoa)
4th Reinforcements………………............17 Apr 1915…….25 May 1915
5th Reinforcements………………............13 Jun 1915…….24 Jul 1915
6th Reinforcements………………............14 Aug 1915…...19 Sep 1915
2nd Maori Contingent ……………..........19 Sep 1915…….26 Oct 1915
6th Reinforcements (balance)............19 Sep 1915……26 Oct 1915
Advance Party 1st + 2nd NZRB….......19 Sep 1915…….26 Oct 1915
1st + 2nd Battalions NZRB……….........09 Oct 1915…….17 Nov 1915
7th Reinforcements………………............09 Oct 1915…….30 Nov 1915
8th Reinforcements………………............14 Nov 1915…...18 Dec 1915

The excellent book ‘Gallipoli the New Zealand story,’ by Christopher Pugsley, mentions on page 90 that. —
“By the time Godley’s men left Egypt, they had received the Second and Third Reinforcements, each nearly 2000 stong. Also to join were New Zealanders of the British Section recruited in England and a Maori contingent, 500 strong.”

Pugsley, mentions on page 94, that at the time of the April 25th landings. —
“Some 1600 New Zealanders from the Infantry Reinforcements would remain in Egypt, as well as Russell’s Brigade and Bauchop’s regiment of Otago Mounted Rifles. The total number of New Zealanders who would sail for the Dardanelles was 6324. This included 522 reinforcements who were to act as ‘hold’ parties to unload stores and remain on board ship until called for.”

It is worth mentioning that prior to the landing on April 25th, at least 300 New Zealanders, the majority of which were side lined in hospitals for medical reasons, and some that were sent back to New Zealand for refusing inoculations and misconduct, each requiring a reinforcement to take their place.

Pugsley, mentions on page 149, that. —
“Official estimates compiled after the war listed New Zealand casualties from 25 to 30 April as approximately 372 dead and 703 wounded and missing, a total of 1075, the majority from the first day.”

The Third Reinforcements arrived on ANZAC on the 6th May 1915, 839 were sent to Cape Helles to join the NZ Infantry Brigade who had arrived at Cape Helles on the 5th May 1915.

The Fourth Reinforcements arrived on ANZAC on the 7th June 1915.

The New Zealand Maori Contingent, 477 strong, arrived at ANZAC on the 3rd July 1915. They were attached to the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade and were sent to No.1 Outpost, which became known as the Maori Pah.



The Fifth Reinforcements arrived on ANZAC on the 8th August 1915, and go into the firing line.

The Sixth Reinforcements and Second Maori Contingent arrived on ANZAC in November 1915

Christopher Pugsley, mentions on page 330 that. —
“By November, the food, the rest and a gradual training programme was restoring the strength of the men. Convalescents were returning and the arrival of the 6th Reinforcements, totalling 2464, slowly built the Brigades up to half strength.
Their arrival marked the end of a chapter. By the end of August, New Zealand casualties numbered 7067 killed and wounded and dead from disease out of a total of for the campaign of 7571.”

“The New Zealand Expeditionary Force by now was mainly made up from the 3rd, 4th and 5th Reinforcements that had joined it at Gallipoli. There were very few of the Main Body left. The Wellington Battalion had 15 and it was the same throughout the brigades.”

Last edited by atillathenunns; 26-12-17 at 11:15 PM.
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  #40  
Old 02-07-15, 11:57 PM
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One for badge researchers to ponder .Driver James Congreve 11/1528,6th reinforcements, wearing an I over a 6,and a similar looking sweetheart badge, listed recently on Trade Me as a 16th reinforcement .
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File Type: jpg Driver James G Congreve(Lumsden) W.I.A 1-5.jpg (117.2 KB, 19 views)
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  #41  
Old 03-07-15, 08:56 PM
Wayne Ihaka Wayne Ihaka is offline
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there was a I squadron in the 6th NZMR reinforcements previously identified in a post by Brent
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  #42  
Old 04-07-15, 01:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Ihaka View Post
there was a I squadron in the 6th NZMR reinforcements previously identified in a post by Brent

Hi Wayne ,I don't seem to recall seeing this post, maybe Brent can elaborate .I see that there was a K company in the 11th reinforcements .The K company badge is not a badge I have seen before in a collection or in a portrait photo .

Cheers Iain
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  #43  
Old 04-07-15, 11:36 PM
Wayne Ihaka Wayne Ihaka is offline
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on the below site - posted 03.02.10 by Brent


http://militarianz.freeforums.org/ne...ase-t1837.html
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  #44  
Old 04-07-15, 11:41 PM
Wayne Ihaka Wayne Ihaka is offline
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note sure where the story of the K company in 11th Reinforcements came from - have never seen a badge with K

I was only with 6th MR reinforcements and hence probably the rarest frame round

you see a few I letters floating round but I am pretty confident most of these are from Irish Guards shoulder titles (separate I and G)

Brent has done a pretty big job on reinforcement drafts and he did not disclose any K company

Laurie Osborne has probably the biggest collection of reinforcements badges frames - has he got one?
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  #45  
Old 05-07-15, 12:42 AM
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Lowes Reinforcement badge book ,page 12

''The 11th reinforcements included A B C & D companies of infantry ,E (1st Battalion, NZ Rifle Brigade 5th reinforcement) ,F (2nd battalion NZ Rifle Brigade ,5th reinforcement) G (3rd Battalion NZ Rifle brigade 2nd reinforcement, H company 4th battalion NZ rifle brigade ,2nd reinforcements).J & K were infantry reinforcements .This was the only time K was used''

I'm only going on the existence of a K company badge off this information Wayne, and its a question if Lowes information is correct .

The answer to your second question is no Laurie does not have this badge
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