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  #1  
Old 12-07-18, 12:31 PM
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signalman signalman is offline
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Default S.A.S. MALYAN SCOUTS.

I picked this up in a job lot of 40's and 50's cloth original badges and titles. I have seen many fakes as we all have but this has somthing about it. Opinions please.
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File Type: jpg sas 1.jpg (36.2 KB, 81 views)
File Type: jpg sas 2.jpg (51.0 KB, 55 views)
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  #2  
Old 12-07-18, 02:36 PM
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Not an original example sorry

The originals are not machine made with tight lettering like your example. They are locally made and have a generally crude appearance
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  #3  
Old 12-07-18, 03:54 PM
Mike B Mike B is offline
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I attach images of an attributed example I have with Pay Book
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  #4  
Old 12-07-18, 03:57 PM
Mike B Mike B is offline
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I will add an image of the reverse here - having problems but hoping this works. This guy (D Sharp) was a bit of a hero - later commissioned.
Note - customised with rounding of ends. Pay book ref to SAS NCO course.
Mike

Last edited by Mike B; 12-07-18 at 04:03 PM.
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  #5  
Old 12-07-18, 04:10 PM
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I hope this works and that members find it of interest

Re: D Sharp - another very interesting individual:


A former member of the Malay Scouts

Major David Sharp, who we recently met at the Chatham Militaria Fair.

14472846: Intelligence Sgt (later Major) David Sharp, BEM: Born Hackney 12.1.28. Formerly Malay Scouts, then HQ 29th Indep. Infantry Brigade Group att. 1st bat. Royal Northumb. Fus.: In Korea at time of capture was with UN Partisan Forces Korea (UNPFK) behind the lines - last and 946th POW to be released in Sept. 1953 aged 25 years, Volunteered Sept. 1945 as a regular in Malaya. Captured at Imjin River 25.4.51, three times wounded. Awarded BEM (Military) for “gallant and distinguished services whilst a POW in Korea” and US Gallantry Award. Made several attempts to escape and was in fact engaged on an escape near the end of his captivity. Was incarcerated in the notorious “wooden boxes” and gave up the chance of a GC award because as senior NCO, he recommended a comrade, Fus. Derek Kinne, in his stead. Arrived home on troopship “Dilwara” at Southampton. WIA/MIA and beaten badly by guards; charged as a war criminal because he refused to give information.

Now a Major (retd.) David was CO of the 16th Indep Paras.

Is today trainer of Special Forces and Govt. Agencies especially in Africa.

There were only a handful of Allied soldiers who escaped from POW camps during the Korean War (1950-3) and little is mentioned or generally known in the UK about this war and the men who fought in it.

ELMS Vice–President, Major David Sharp, was one of the few who escaped.

Although British authorities officially denied any British personnel were on special operations in Korea, there were in fact five.

David enlisted in 1945, and was posted to the Far East in 1946 on ‘special duties’, before becoming an instructor at the British Jungle Warfare School. After the outbreak of the Korean War in June 1950, the US Army were looking for personnel with ‘behind the lines’ experience and David volunteered, serving with them on intelligence operations deep inside North Korea from the end of 1950 until the end of March 1951. David was due to be returned to his Battalion, when the Battle of The Imjin River occurred and he was wounded and captured whilst trying to break a Chinese road-block.

He was left injured at the side of a road, with several others, without any treatment or assistance for five days. Eventually, recognising that the wounded men were no threat, some Chinese soldiers gave them food and two days later the wounded soldiers were put into the back of a pony wagon and taken to the POW collection point.

Once there, David faced his first of many interrogations and three weeks later he was put onto a death-march of over 300 miles. It was during the march that he made his first escape attempt; but after four days he was re-captured by Chinese troops. David was ‘worked over’ and returned to the march. He later arrived at a place called Mun-Hari, where several ‘special’ POWs [including David] were taken away from the column and interrogated severely; this included being bound with rope and placed in a bunker for 28 days; and being tied to a tree in front of a firing squad who then went through the very realistic motions of being about to shoot him – this was intended to frighten him, and David admits that it did!

After another march north, David’s interrogation and confinement continued until February 1952, when he was placed in front of a tribunal and accused of being an intelligence agent and being a ‘disturbing element in the POW camps’ – i.e. causing trouble for the Chinese authorities. He was sentenced to be transferred to a ‘special place’ then handed over to the Korean Security Police and put into a Korean jail.
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Old 12-07-18, 04:26 PM
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Thank you for that Mike,

Some great pieces and fascinating information too.

Cheers,

Roy
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  #7  
Old 12-07-18, 04:35 PM
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Members with an interest in the SAS might be interested in the attached drawing which appeared in Bulletin No7 of the Military Heraldry Society issued in October 1952 in the section devoted to new badges spotted by members. It shows an identical title to that first posted

At that date it seems very unlikely that anyone was making fake badges to fool collectors so does this suggest that the badge was made - the example shown is quite well made - possibly in Britain but never used as the regiment was in Malaya?

If not can anyone suggest why it was around in 1952?

Jon
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File Type: jpg Straight bottom title MHerSoc Bulletin No 7 Oct 1952.jpg (120.0 KB, 85 views)

Last edited by Postwarden; 13-07-18 at 10:19 AM. Reason: spelling
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  #8  
Old 12-07-18, 05:25 PM
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Major David Sharp's medal group. He passed away in November 2016 in Ashford, Kent.

Tim
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File Type: jpg David Sharp.jpg (45.2 KB, 40 views)
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  #9  
Old 12-07-18, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike B View Post
I attach images of an attributed example I have with Pay Book
Mike,
Great items and background information.
Jack
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  #10  
Old 12-07-18, 05:54 PM
Mike B Mike B is offline
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Thanks everyone for the additional information

Tim - great to see an image of Major Sharp's medal group

We are lucky to have such an excellent forum ... so much to learn

Mike
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  #11  
Old 12-07-18, 07:10 PM
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Thank you for your post Jon i would also wonder why in 1952 it was reported as worn.
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  #12  
Old 13-07-18, 10:50 PM
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Default Was this a recent auction per chance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by signalman View Post
I picked this up in a job lot of 40's and 50's cloth original badges and titles. I have seen many fakes as we all have but this has somthing about it. Opinions please.
If this was an auction this week, i saw this, and just wasnt sure.
Not a bad copy if it is such.
As written, most insignia from the MS tend to be hand made and therefore unique.
KR
Jon
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  #13  
Old 13-07-18, 10:51 PM
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Default Love your stuff Mike B

Mike,
As always my friend, thanks for sharing the wealth.
Regards
Jon
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  #14  
Old 14-07-18, 08:27 AM
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There are many similarities in construct between 'signalmans' and Mike's titles. There are subtle differences to the front but the rear construct is very similar.

Also interesting was the bulletin highlighting a similar title construct

Thoughts?

Paul
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  #15  
Old 15-07-18, 02:05 PM
Mike B Mike B is offline
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Thanks for the kind comments - just back from a long hot camp ... great company and banter as ever - but now catching up ... so please excuse brevity

Jon188 - your expertise regarding these Malayan pieces far exceeds mine - always good to hear your thoughts

Yes indeed - similarities are evident re title in post 1 and my 'cut down' one.
Re the 'Bulletin' reference from Jon (Postwarden) - I agree ... the bulletin is always a useful source and a good reason to join the Military Heraldry Society. The article is a very useful reference, which I think Jon is exploring further. To me, such articles prove a useful guide to 'existence' by a certain date - not necessarily 'wear' at that date. No doubt Jon will get to the bottom of it or have a useful theory.
I attach an image of a weird example - the colours being quite garish.
Hoping this is all in the 'spirit' of the origins of the thread, and welcoming further thoughts
Regards
Mike
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