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  #16  
Old 17-06-08, 06:58 PM
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if you read the notes in Gaylor,he states that "the Sussex Yeomanry" kc was the 1st staybrite badge.Whether this means the 1st produced or the 1st to go on issue im not sure.
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  #17  
Old 17-06-08, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Cultman Collectables View Post
Hi As a collector of almost 40 years I have always felt that there is a great difference between Chrome badges and A/A or Staybrite badges. After the 2nd world war in the late 40's chrome badges were first introduced in an attempt to save soldiers the need to polish badges. The problem was that such badges could only ever be in one colour e.g. silver or white metal. They were fine for regiments such as the KSLI but of no value to regiments with all brass badges i.e. Royal Engineers or bi-metal i.e. The Northants. There advantage was however they were hard wearing. I am told that some of the bi-metal badges were produced in chrome and I have often had these come through my hands. Some old sweats have assured me they wore chrome badges when they were in the territorial army during the late 40's e.g. The Notts & Derby regt. It appears that the problem with regular units having to change bi-metal badges for single tone and the cost of production meant the army eventually chose to go towards anodised aluminium badges. Some units such as the Gurkhas continued using the chrome badges for much longer and are thus more frequently found on the market. I hope this adds to the thread. Best wishes, Graham
Hi Graham,

This is a good historical posting and one that I may re-visit in the future.

Will keep in touch on this.

Regards

Chris
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  #18  
Old 29-07-08, 01:56 PM
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Hi Chris,

Sorry I've been away on holiday. Thanks for your comments.

Best wishes,
Graham
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  #19  
Old 29-07-08, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike H View Post
if you read the notes in Gaylor,he states that "the Sussex Yeomanry" kc was the 1st staybrite badge.Whether this means the 1st produced or the 1st to go on issue im not sure.

I think that he must have meant first to go on general issue. The 'Field' trails were conducted by an Ordnance Coy using the old WW2 patttern k/c badge. These were some of the 'first' ones to be made but the RAOC did not adopt them across the Corps and were still wearing the revised design in bi-metal both k/c and q/c for some years.

One can only surmise that being a small unit the Sussex Yeomanry did not have many k/c brass badges left in the ordnance stocks in 1949 so when they ordered new ones, their order was one of the first made in a/a and issued as such. As an aside most Infantry and Yeomanry Units seemed to have kept their old metal badges until the late 1950s and beyond so they presumably were better off.

It does seem that a/a was slow in to service and came about as a result of new designs being needed rather than a wholesale conversion of all patterns. With true WD frugality all existing stocks seem to have been used up first even if the regte were still wearing k/c metal badges up to the 1960s.

Alan
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  #20  
Old 29-07-08, 07:25 PM
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Alan, Graham.

This is good historical background information that (with both your permissions) I may use in the future for possible publication.

Would this be OK?

Regards

Chris
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  #21  
Old 30-07-08, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Alan Owen View Post
I think that he must have meant first to go on general issue. The 'Field' trails were conducted by an Ordnance Coy using the old WW2 patttern k/c badge. These were some of the 'first' ones to be made but the RAOC did not adopt them across the Corps and were still wearing the revised design in bi-metal both k/c and q/c for some years.
Alan
Hi Alan,

I did not intend to progress past mistakes in the classification of anodised items for the moment but this might be a good time to step in and obtain some more classification information to put away in my 'snippets' document for later.

Question, were KC RAOC badges in anodised aluminium ever issued or did they remain as experimental items only? Basically, were the first anodised badges issued to RAOC members Queens Crown?

If the KC items were never issued they may well fit nicely into a classification of 'officially commissioned but never issued' or even a classification of 'experimental'.

Regards

Chris
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  #22  
Old 30-07-08, 09:54 AM
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Chris,

My understanding is that a batch were made as trial badges in the old design with k/c. They were worn for a trial period by an RAOC Coy. They were not popular and there were problems with them. They did not go into general issue if for no other reason that the RAOC probably had huge stocks of the old ones in brass to use up. As it was the corps changed its badge design soon after and the new smaller badge was made in bi-metal and in a/a (although the latter is very scarce). Even when q/c ones were inroduced these were initially made in bi-metal and later on in a/a.

The Ordnance badges were all in issued in both metal and a/a versions but it was not until the Q/C that they were universally worn in a/a across the Corps.

Alan
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  #23  
Old 30-07-08, 11:17 AM
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I suppose it has little to do with the core of this thread but during the whole of my service I hated staybrite badges with a passion. Fortunately I didn't have to wear one personally except while at RMAS.

But it was certainly true that the very first thing that any self-respecting Gunner who was hoping for his first tape did was to acquire a proper brass badge for his beret.

And when I was an RHA BC I had a supply of silver cyphers made for my WOs.

But seriously I can say with absolute certainty that I never heard them referred to as anodised aluminium by even the most rule bound Q bloke.

Thank the Lord they are gone or going! Do the world a favour - hit one with a hammer today.

Last edited by Eddie Parks; 31-07-08 at 05:58 AM.
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  #24  
Old 30-07-08, 04:13 PM
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ha ha,nice one eddie,a great big lump hammer.always called staybrite and loathed.i still have half a draw of damaged ones from army cadet,regular and t.a. service.
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  #25  
Old 30-07-08, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Owen View Post
Chris,

My understanding is that a batch were made as trial badges in the old design with k/c. They were worn for a trial period by an RAOC Coy. They were not popular and there were problems with them. They did not go into general issue if for no other reason that the RAOC probably had huge stocks of the old ones in brass to use up. As it was the corps changed its badge design soon after and the new smaller badge was made in bi-metal and in a/a (although the latter is very scarce). Even when q/c ones were inroduced these were initially made in bi-metal and later on in a/a.

The Ordnance badges were all in issued in both metal and a/a versions but it was not until the Q/C that they were universally worn in a/a across the Corps.

Alan
Thanks Alan,

I may well use this in an 'Experimental and Testing; chapter.

Regards

Chris
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  #26  
Old 30-07-08, 07:25 PM
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Originally Posted by signalman View Post
ha ha,nice one eddie,a great big lump hammer.always called staybrite and loathed.i still have half a draw of damaged ones from army cadet,regular and t.a. service.

Don't be too quick with the hammer boys - some of these badges sell for 500 quid plus...
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  #27  
Old 30-07-08, 07:54 PM
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'Gurkha Boys' springs to mind!
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  #28  
Old 30-07-08, 08:08 PM
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'Gurkha Boys' springs to mind!
Not so much that one which goes for around the 100 pound mark but a KC RASC sold a couple of years ago for (I think - my notes are at home) 675 pounds odd.

Regards

Chris
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  #29  
Old 31-07-08, 06:12 AM
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Well as long as they aren't on soldiers' uniforms you can pay what you like for them. With the possible exception of the Broderick cap they are the ugliest pieces of junk ever foisted on a long suffering soldiery.
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  #30  
Old 31-07-08, 07:36 AM
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Well as long as they aren't on soldiers' uniforms you can pay what you like for them. With the possible exception of the Broderick cap they are the ugliest pieces of junk ever foisted on a long suffering soldiery.
Don't hold back now Eddie, say what you really think mate....

Regards

Chris
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