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  #1  
Old 02-09-20, 11:59 AM
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DougSA DougSA is offline
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Default Quartermaster rank insignia?

I would be most grateful if anyone can assist to identify the insignia in the attached photograph, worn on the lower sleeve by a gent serving with a Scottish regiment in the WW1 era (or pre-WW1).

I assume that the stripes are rank insignia for a Quartermaster. I have no idea regarding the patch above the stripes.

Any insights welcome!
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File Type: jpeg WW1 era rank - maybe QM.jpeg (84.4 KB, 80 views)
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  #2  
Old 02-09-20, 12:51 PM
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Looks like crossed bugles. Possibly a bugle major to a rifle or light infantry regiment.
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Old 02-09-20, 01:14 PM
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Yes indeed - crossed bugles although I hadn't worked it out.
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Old 02-09-20, 02:19 PM
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Can you see the other arm in the photo? If not, I would assume those are GC stripes. Those are crossed bugles, but I had thought they were normally worn on the upper arm?

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  #5  
Old 02-09-20, 02:28 PM
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Rifles Buttons.
Rifle Pattern Sergeants leather sword belt.
Insignia worn on both sleeves.
Therefore Bugle Major in a Rifle Regiment.

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  #6  
Old 02-09-20, 03:55 PM
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Yes, beyond any doubt whatsoever. The crossed bugles were not by any means always worn ........ some units BMs wore the single version. Conversely, double bugles are not unknown on lower ranking buglers.


A very good example, super photo.
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  #7  
Old 02-09-20, 10:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpy View Post
Yes, beyond any doubt whatsoever. The crossed bugles were not by any means always worn ........ some units BMs wore the single version. Conversely, double bugles are not unknown on lower ranking buglers.


A very good example, super photo.
Quite true,the LI Bugle Major wore a single facing on each forearm above his stripes in No2 dress. These were facing. The single facing as the cap badge on it's own was used as the trade badge for LI buglers.
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Old 03-09-20, 10:17 AM
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Thank you all for taking the time to check the photo and provide insights, it is greatly appreciated!

Yes, the gent in question was with a rifles regiment, and the inverted stripes are on both sleeves, consistent with him being a Bugle Major.
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  #9  
Old 03-09-20, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike H View Post
Quite true,the LI Bugle Major wore a single facing on each forearm above his stripes in No2 dress. These were facing. The single facing as the cap badge on it's own was used as the trade badge for LI buglers.
A minor pedantry: buglers were not vulgar tradesmen, they were appointed and paid extra, equal to drummers, and thus not rank and file.
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  #10  
Old 04-09-20, 07:43 AM
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As manchesters has said, at the time of the photo the double bugles badge was a clothing regulation specifically for rifle regiments and those Territorial Force battalions that through special heritage from their Rifle Volunteer Corps origins were permitted rifles appointments. Since No2 dress was introduced in the 1960s that strict differential was relaxed and various line regiments used double bugle badges as a marker for their special bugler appointments. This was sometimes as a prize for a man nominated as the Adjutant’s or Commanding Officer’s bugler.
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