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  #1  
Old 25-05-20, 03:02 PM
DDEV DDEV is offline
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Default RTR Questions

First thing, comments on the authenticity of the badges would be welcome.

Are plastic badges even something that get faked?

The original Fear Naught badge had the 6 pounder facing right. I read that the right facing tank was considered in “full retreat” so the badge was changed to have the tank face left. Who decided that? If I lay the badge down on a map of Europe I want it going right.
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Old 25-05-20, 04:01 PM
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Alan O Alan O is offline
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Yes plastics have been faked but not to the extent that they are anything like the originals. Various ones have been cast in plastic resin for the re-enactors to dress up as paratroopers etc.

The change in tank direction was due to the change of headgear from the leaked cap to the beret. Once the badge was worn over the left eye it looked wrong so they changed the direction.
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Old 25-05-20, 05:29 PM
cavalryman cavalryman is offline
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Default RTR badges

Both badges look fine, the plastic ones usually have a slight warp to them.

By the way retreat is NOT a word in the dictionary of any Armoured unit, it's called withdrawing in contact. regards John
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  #4  
Old 26-05-20, 04:11 PM
DDEV DDEV is offline
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Alan the right facing tank worn on the left side would appear to be withdrawing from contact and couldn't be acceptable. I wonder if this was taken under consideration before the hats were changed so the left facing tank badge was available at the same time as the new beret?

John, thanks for the reply. I have a non badge question about withdrawing from contact. In open terrain like the western desert would this be accomplished by stepping on the gas and making a 180 which would expose the back of the tank which in most cases had less armour?
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Old 26-05-20, 06:09 PM
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The beret came first. The badge was changed some months later.
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Old 30-05-20, 05:25 PM
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Third Tankie Third Tankie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DDEV View Post
Alan the right facing tank worn on the left side would appear to be withdrawing from contact and couldn't be acceptable. I wonder if this was taken under consideration before the hats were changed so the left facing tank badge was available at the same time as the new beret?

John, thanks for the reply. I have a non badge question about withdrawing from contact. In open terrain like the western desert would this be accomplished by stepping on the gas and making a 180 which would expose the back of the tank which in most cases had less armour?
DDEV,

With 20 years served in The Royal Tank Regiment I feel qualified to answer your question.

A withdrawal in contact within a unit should always be covered with supporting fire from the other callsigns within that unit regardless of its size, ie troop, squadron or regiment. The withdrawing callsigns, although exposing their weakest rear armour to the enemy, would travel with guns facing rear. This identifies them to the covering vehicles as friendly and may allow them to still engage the enemy. Once past the covering forces they would take up similar firing positions.This leapfrogging continues until contact with the enemy has been broken and they can move to the rear to replenish with fuel and ammo and consolidate in a concentration area and await further tasking. Any other "hurried" movement to the rear without being covered would be a considered a rout.

Hope this helps

Kevin
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Old 10-06-20, 01:50 PM
DDEV DDEV is offline
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Thanks Kevin. I haven't read too much on modern tank warfare, but you can sure see the advantage of having wireless communication between tanks. Your answer did jog my memory a bit as I remember reading Rommel leapfrogged his army out of Egypt and Libya.

I imagine there is no manual on the rout option.
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