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  #16  
Old 05-04-21, 07:51 PM
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But the Royal Army Clothing Department was abolished in 1933. Also a beret is a cap but not a hat.

The current issue is still a cap badge!

Tab on!

Tim
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Last edited by grey_green_acorn; 05-04-21 at 08:02 PM.
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  #17  
Old 06-04-21, 08:34 AM
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Touche Tim

Indeed the Tab is still on!

The info is from Oliver Locks book British Airborne Insignia

But would a Beret be referred to as a cap?

https://www.bon-clic-bon-genre.eu/co...h-berets_0.htm

Phill
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  #18  
Old 06-04-21, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Kelley View Post
I'd be rather surprised if that term was in popular usage during the period in which the badges in this thread were actually worn, as far as I an aware, it was not.
According to the Oxford English Dictionary the earliest evidence of the term being used was in a 1972 novel by Marshall Pugh titled Murmur of Mutiny about British paratroopers based in the Middle East.

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They found it difficult enough to accept officers of other regiments wearing the conventional caps which they called crap-hats.

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  #19  
Old 06-04-21, 10:20 AM
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I always thought crap hat, grunt etc were terms the British picked up from the American forces or films post WWII, maybe Vietnam era.

"Murmur of Mutiny", I remember reading that way back in the 70's., and a sequel "A Dream of Treason".
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  #20  
Old 06-04-21, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by mike_vee View Post
According to the Oxford English Dictionary the earliest evidence of the term being used was in a 1972 novel by Marshall Pugh titled Murmur of Mutiny about British paratroopers based in the Middle East.




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It was always a term used with great affection from an old work mate of mine who was in the Paras in the 50ís , said with love and affection about most ,but with special sentiment when talking about the Royal Marines

Gerard
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  #21  
Old 06-04-21, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by gb64 View Post
It was always a term used with great affection from an old work mate of mine who was in the Paras in the 50ís , said with love and affection about most ,but with special sentiment when talking about the Royal Marines

Gerard
My Para Reg 'mates' always referred to me as a cabbage hat - but then I jumped out of planes more than most of them...
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  #22  
Old 06-04-21, 03:09 PM
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The infantry battalion I was in back in the 70's used the term "cabbage heads" as a nickname for RM.

A grandfather who was in the RN 1919 - 45 apparently referred to Marines as "Mary-Annes", a nickname I've never heard used by anyone else.
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