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  #16  
Old 21-09-17, 02:05 AM
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Hi all

Thanks for your feedback.
I can confirm that the 1914 badge is marked "J.A RESTALL" but the big 1915 badge has NO marks (but simple copper loops as you might find on a cap badge). I suspect that this one is the work of a "local" maker using a struck Union Jack (these would have been plentiful at the time).

The Monmouth badge is a J.R. Gaunt effort and the "22nd Area" has the RD number on the "half moon" clip that you see on many Gaunt badges so may well be one of theirs too.
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  #17  
Old 21-09-17, 11:26 AM
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Thanks for that, all of the (admittedly few) 1914 Volunteer badges I have seen were Renstall marked.

Just on the "RD" number - is this similar (or the same?) thing as the "REG" mark and numbers seen on some Railway service badges by Thomas Fattorini?
see attached:

Cheers and thanks, Tim
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File Type: jpg IMG_7937.jpg (85.4 KB, 4 views)
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  #18  
Old 22-09-17, 02:41 AM
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Hi all

Here's another picture of the mystery "22nd Area" badge but arguably a slightly better one that the one before.

The RD number that I mentioned is actually "RD" followed by a number that begins "63......". I would have to go and look to see what the actual number is but it can be found on many "on war service" badges made by J.R. Gaunt and also association items.

The Restall "1914 Volunteered" doesn't have an "RD" marking so sorry if it seemed so.

Still keen to know where "22nd Area" is if anyone can tell me....

The badge was an eBay find along with the BIG 1915 effort whereas the "Monmouthshire" badge came from the U.S.A. along with about 10 other war service badges for around US$30 each from a dealer website.

Originally a little damaged it was expertly re-enamelled for the cost of a nice bottle of wine!
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File Type: jpg recruit3.jpg (33.2 KB, 11 views)
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  #19  
Old 22-09-17, 02:46 AM
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Hi

Sorry. Just seen your picture of the Fattorini badge. Yes, that's it so maybe they ARE Fattorini and NOT Gaunt. So it is "REG" and NOT "RD"....
Confused? I am!
Truth to tell, most of those "OWS" badges are made by Fattorini.
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  #20  
Old 22-09-17, 11:14 AM
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All good, thanks for the extra info.

The reg mark is, as I understand it, a kind of registered design/patient number?? Happy to be corrected there.

And along with JA Wylie, Fattorini seems to be the major supplier. Gaunt is often seen as well, but I have to say I am not really experienced in these enough to be categorical. Hopefully the area 22 mystery will be solved by someone as well.

Thanks, Tim
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  #21  
Old 25-09-17, 01:22 AM
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Hi Tim

I was wondering if that REG number might have been some "patent" for the half-moon clip as the same number appears with so many different designs but it seems a bit strange that they should be so "proprietorial" about a means to retain a badge. Anything is possible I guess....

If you like "home front" stuff, keep an eye out for some curiously "personalised" IMPERIAL SERVICE tablets.

Coming soon to a post near you!
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  #22  
Old 25-09-17, 10:56 AM
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Interesting thought. I agree, nothing is impossible, it' just there were so many lapel badges, both authorised and unauthorised, it seems strange. But maybe there is a subtle difference I and not seeing. Certainly the Fattorini Railway badges have a slightly more 'pillow' shape' fixing, but not sure thats reason enough. Is it possible the front is actually the thing? Something to do with the enamelling process? We may never know.

As for Home front stuff, the more you want to share, the better! I am really enjoying this, and the new section devoted to it - (Thanks Jon!!)

Cheers, Tim
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  #23  
Old 28-09-17, 01:30 PM
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I think Chipper and Peter have the answer ... just came across this in the Western Mail - Saturday 19 December 1914: "BADGES FOR THE REJECTED The badges for those who have failed to pass the medical test, which a prominent Cardiff gentlemen has presented, have arrived at the Glamorgan headquarters, and at this and the sub-stations will be given to men who are rejected. They are neat metal badges about the size of a sovereign, surmounted by a Crown, and inscribed in letters of gold over a red and white background are the words, "Volunteer, 1914."

Steve
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  #24  
Old 28-09-17, 02:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaker123 View Post
I think Chipper and Peter have the answer ... just came across this in the Western Mail - Saturday 19 December 1914: "BADGES FOR THE REJECTED The badges for those who have failed to pass the medical test, which a prominent Cardiff gentlemen has presented, have arrived at the Glamorgan headquarters, and at this and the sub-stations will be given to men who are rejected. They are neat metal badges about the size of a sovereign, surmounted by a Crown, and inscribed in letters of gold over a red and white background are the words, "Volunteer, 1914."

Steve
I think Sir that you have got to the answer at last and reading what you have found out, it really does make sense. Thank you.
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  #25  
Old 28-09-17, 04:03 PM
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Absolutely outstanding. Thanks for posting this. It makes perfect sense, as Australia had similar badges (as in rejected volunteers).

Thanks Steve, very much appreciated

Cheers, Tim
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  #26  
Old 29-09-17, 12:59 AM
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Hi Tim (et al.)

Excellent! We have a searchable NZ newspaper archive that has solved SO many "mysteries" with regards to my badges that I've lost count.

For example, I'd had a small silver badge for the "N.Z. Soldier's Association" for some time and it had eluded ALL attempts at identification. I knew that it was "different" and NOT the Returned Soldiers' Association.

The newspaper gave me the answer: a small, short-lived association for "home servicemen" that had to change their name because of the similarity to the R.S.A proper. What clinched it was a description of the badge itself.

It then became the "Home Servicemen's League of N.Z." with a new (larger) badge.

Photos on the way!
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