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  #16  
Old 20-01-18, 10:02 PM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Originally Posted by manchesters View Post
Thanks,

here are some of my Robert NZ artillery badges:-

regards
Simon they are nice set of badges.

For those who have not seen them before-
The top left (L within a wreath) is a Gun-laying proficiency badge circa 1903 to 1906 (but may have been worn up until 1910).
The top centre red Star is an Efficiency star circa 1906 to 1910, and was worn above the proficiency badges on the left arm.
The top right (L within a wreath) is a Gun-laying proficiency badge circa 1906 to 1910.
The centre badge I am not 100% sure, but believe it to be a Field Engineering proficiency badge circa 1903 to 1906 (but again may have been worn up until 1910)
The bottom left is a 1st Class Artillery Batteries or Companies proficiency badge circa 1906 to 1910.
The bottom centre crossed cannons was awarded for 3 years efficient service as Garrison Artillery or Submarine Miners 1903 to 1906. (But again may have been worn up until 1910)
The bottom right (G within a wreath) is a Gunnery proficiency badge circa 1906 to 1910. There was also a “Distinguished” Gunnery proficiency badge where the “G” was in gold instead of red.
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  #17  
Old 20-01-18, 10:41 PM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Originally Posted by stevjp View Post
Superb hat Brent,
attached is a belt buckle center, similar to one in your photo.
All the best
James
James is your buckle centre brass or white metal?
Your buckle centre is the cut out version, which I am leaning to be senior NCO/Officers issue.
Regardless it is not as common as the solid version below.

The last 3 photos are from the grand collection of Laurie Osborne, the first is a Victorian crown NCO/Officers buckle, the second is a Victorian crown ORs buckle and last is a Kings crown ORs buckle.





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  #18  
Old 20-01-18, 10:55 PM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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The following badges are also from the famed Laurie Osborne collection, the top one now resides in Tepapa museum.
They are both from a D. Battery, N.Z. Reg. A.V. Artillery Volunteers trophy belt, the top one is silver, 44mm wide, and is engraved Presented by Capt. St. Hill.
The bottom one is white metal and 32mm diameter.



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  #19  
Old 21-01-18, 07:30 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Default New Zealand Permanent Artillery Sergeants/Officers Forage Cap

New Zealand Permanent Artillery Sergeants/Officers Forage Cap (circa 1889 to 1902)

The following blue cloth forage cap has been in my collection for a long time, initially I had no idea what it was but over the years I have narrowed its time line to around 1889 to 1902 based on the New Zealand dress regulations.

The use of the “forage cap without peak” (commonly referred to as a pillbox cap) by New Zealand Artillery Volunteers dates back to the early 1860s, however, the earliest NZ Dress Regulations that I can find for NZ Artillery were first gazetted on the 11th November 1870 as follows. —
Artillery and Artillery Cadets
Blue cloth or serge jumper, scarlet collar and trimmings.
Trousers; blue, with red stripe 1 ¾ inch wide down outward seam, and brown leather leggings.
Forage cap without peak; blue cloth, with band of silver lace for officers and sergeants, and scarlet cloth 1 ¾ inch wide, silver or white cloth button and braid on top.
Sword with steel scabbard; sword belt brown leather. Pouch and pouch belt, same as cavalry.”

The fact that my forage cap has gold lace and that the NZ Dress Regulations gazetted on the 3rd February 1866 state. —
Dress Regulations.
82. The following general rules must be adhered to: —
a. Gold lace is not to be worn by any of the colonial forces.”


Fortunately for me the NZ Dress Regulations gazetted on the 28th March 1889 state. —
Dress Regulations.
1. The distinctions in uniform and appointments which are prescribed in Her Majesty’s Regular Service to donate the rank of the wearer will be observed strictly by Volunteers of the various grades, as far as they are applicable to the Volunteer Force, substituting silver for gold lace, except in the case of the Permanent Staff and Naval Artillery Volunteers, who will wear gold lace.”


Unfortunately for me a copy of the 1976 NZ Artillery Regimental History that was issued to “all gunners on enlistment into the regiment” states on page 44. —
“The New Zealand Regular Artillery
When the first New Zealand Permanent Militia formed in 1886, from the Field Force portion of the NZ Armed Constabulary, it contained four garrison artillery batteries (6,7 and 8 in) at the four main ports, and one field artillery battery (6pdr Nordenfeldts), The first permanent instructor in gunnery to these regulars being appointed in late 1891. In 1897 these regular gunners became No 1 Service Coy NZ Permanent Force.”

The unfortunate part is that if the first permanent instructor in gunnery wasn’t appointed until 1891, this puts some doubt that my cap being as early as 1889.
The 1976 history does not name the first permanent instructor, but it is most likely to be Sergeant Major Bush of the NZ Permanent Artillery, who in January 1891 became the principle instructor of Volunteers in big gun drill based in Auckland.

However while researching Sergeant Major Bush I found that he had succeeded Sergeant Major Silver of the NZ Permanent Artillery who had transferred to Wellington, which suggests that the 1976 history is incorrect on its timelines for the first permanent instructor.
Interestingly, Sergeant Major Silver at the time of his transfer was considered to be the best gunnery instructor in New Zealand, and was responsible for superintending the mounting of the guns at Fort Takapuna.
Sergeant Major Silver joined the Imperial service in 1865, and served in a gunboat on the West Coast of Africa, and was in the Ashantee War under General Wolseley and Sir Evelyn Wood in several campaigns.

The NZ Dress Regulations gazetted on the 11th September 1895 state under the title of Permanent Artillery. —
“Forage Cap— As worn by Royal Artillery”

The Gold lace is the regulation pattern for the Royal Artillery.





Photo believed to be Sergeant Major Bush, NZ Permanent Artillery.

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  #20  
Old 21-01-18, 09:59 AM
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manchesters manchesters is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atillathenunns View Post
Simon they are nice set of badges.

For those who have not seen them before-
The top left (L within a wreath) is a Gun-laying proficiency badge circa 1903 to 1906 (but may have been worn up until 1910).
The top centre red Star is an Efficiency star circa 1906 to 1910, and was worn above the proficiency badges on the left arm.
The top right (L within a wreath) is a Gun-laying proficiency badge circa 1906 to 1910.
The centre badge I am not 100% sure, but believe it to be a Field Engineering proficiency badge circa 1903 to 1906 (but again may have been worn up until 1910)
The bottom left is a 1st Class Artillery Batteries or Companies proficiency badge circa 1906 to 1910.
The bottom centre crossed cannons was awarded for 3 years efficient service as Garrison Artillery or Submarine Miners 1903 to 1906. (But again may have been worn up until 1910)
The bottom right (G within a wreath) is a Gunnery proficiency badge circa 1906 to 1910. There was also a “Distinguished” Gunnery proficiency badge where the “G” was in gold instead of red.

Thankyou for the information.

regards
__________________
Simon Butterworth

Manchester Regiment Collector
Rank, Prize & Trade Badges
British & Commonwealth Artillery Badges
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  #21  
Old 31-01-18, 12:03 AM
kingsley kingsley is offline
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Nice to see the other ranks WM plume socket on the busby. These arty badges seem to be generic for NZ, Australian colonies, and possibly other parts of the Empire.
Can anyone tell me whether the concurrent NZ officer pattern was the same design? (see scan)
There are of course the coat of arms plume sockets as well as the gun variety and it has never been clear to me whether they were worn by the same artillery units at different periods, or whether each unit chose its own pattern and stuck to it.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg officerVolartySocket.JPG (34.2 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg VA1.jpg (59.5 KB, 11 views)
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  #22  
Old 01-02-18, 06:22 AM
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atillathenunns atillathenunns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsley View Post
Nice to see the other ranks WM plume socket on the busby. These arty badges seem to be generic for NZ, Australian colonies, and possibly other parts of the Empire.
Can anyone tell me whether the concurrent NZ officer pattern was the same design? (see scan)
There are of course the coat of arms plume sockets as well as the gun variety and it has never been clear to me whether they were worn by the same artillery units at different periods, or whether each unit chose its own pattern and stuck to it.
Hard to say with NZ officer pattern busby badges as not a lot of information available. I have a few period photos but none are clear enough to see the badge details.

The following photos are of a officers busby that is an Auckland museum. The interesting thing about the badge is that the crown and lion have been removed.
I have another photo on file of an officers plume badge from a different NZ museum, I will post a picture when I can find it.





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  #23  
Old 01-02-18, 08:03 PM
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fougasse1940 fougasse1940 is offline
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Perhaps it came with a Victorian crown and was still worn upon introduction of the King's crown?

Rgds, Thomas
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